Focus Point, Rear Sight? Front? Target?

Discussion in 'Firearm Related' started by Nemo, Mar 26, 2019.

  1. Nemo

    Nemo Man of Myth and Legend

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    Do it on the target. Forget the front post focus point.

    Nemo

    https://www.alloutdoor.com/2019/03/20/handgun-shooting-dont-focus-front-sight/


     
  2. DonT

    DonT Deplorable bitter clinger.

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    That is not correct technique. Sure, you may be able to get away with target focus, at close ranges. But when you get beyond 9 or 10 feet, it is going to be incredibly easy to miss, with no front sight focus. Focusing on the front sight doesn't even mean, not looking at the target...you still are looking at and seeing the target.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2019

  3. Nemo

    Nemo Man of Myth and Legend

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    It works for me at the 15 to 25 yard range on a man size target in an action pistol match.

    Nemo
     
  4. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

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    I teach not to use sights at all in one of my classes.
     
  5. zetor

    zetor Gaston beat up John

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    Is that the bludgeoning your adversary with a jammed up 1911 drill?:)
     
  6. DonT

    DonT Deplorable bitter clinger.

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    If you are able to consistently hit a man sized target at 15 to 25 yards, I would bet you are in fact focusing most of the time on your front sight.
     
  7. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

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    No...

    It's the shooting center mass from the hip.
     
  8. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    In the excitement of real combat, you might lose the front sight, and not be able to find it to do any sort of sight alignment--even a sloppy "flash sight picture."

    If you can't find the sights in a hurry, you'll either delay shooting while you attempt to find them (which can get you killed) or you will fire your gun without using the sights at all, which might work. Or you might miss the target and get killed. Or your errant shots could nail some innocent person in the background.

    I think that's why defensive combat shooting instructors teach to look at the front sight --to focus on it. it is not for the same reason as you hear this advice from shooting coaches who are training serious athletes to shoot tiny bull's-eyes at slow fire competitive matches. They're trying to get a perfect sight picture, but for combat shooting I think the goal is simply to keep the front sight in your vision and not have it fade from sight.
     
  9. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    In the excitement of real combat, you might lose the front sight, and not be able to find it to do any sort of sight alignment--even a sloppy "flash sight picture."

    If you can't find the sights in a hurry, you'll either delay shooting while you attempt to find them (which can get you killed) or you will fire your gun without using the sights at all, which might work. Or you might miss the target and get killed. Or your errant shots could nail some innocent person in the background.

    I think that's why defensive combat shooting instructors teach to look at the front sight --to focus on it. it is not for the same reason as you hear this advice from shooting coaches who are training serious athletes to shoot tiny bull's-eyes at slow fire competitive matches. They're trying to get a perfect sight picture, but for combat shooting I think the goal is simply to keep the front sight in your vision and not have it fade from sight.
     
  10. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

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    Too many here focus on shooting tiny groups instead of vital areas of the target. Easy to so stand up target shooting. Snap shooting is the skill you need to develop for defense shooting. Shooting in situations where time for a good sight picture is not available.
     
  11. mrhutch

    mrhutch Well-Known Member

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    Instinctive shooting is good to practice.

    For non-firing drills, simply point your pistol at your target without using the signts. Then move your head to line up the sights and see how close you were. You don't have to shoot them in the eye at 25 feet, but it's not difficult to achieve the hand-eye coordination and muscle memory to draw, extend, shoot and hit the 9 ring from across the room without actually using the sights.
    images.jpg
     
  12. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    The only time I did not look at the front sight when drawing on a person in an emergency was when contact distance was involved (including actual contact of the muzzle to a person's skull behind the ear with a stern instruction and a clear warning as to the immediate consequences of the failure to follow my instruction).