Flying

Discussion in 'GA Laws and Politics' started by misawa, Oct 18, 2007.

  1. misawa

    misawa New Member

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    I'm likely to be starting a new job in January that will have me traveling to other states. Sometimes by car, but I'm sure there will be a fair amount of airplane travel involved. I know to check the reciprocity of the state I'm going to and whatever their laws are, but if I am flying, how do I take my gun with me? Or, can I?
     
  2. S&W 40

    S&W 40 Active Member

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  3. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    No problem so long as your are legal at the arriving gate. I always bring a gun when flying.
     
  4. N.T.F.S.

    N.T.F.S. Active Member

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    Warning about traveling through New York airports

    So much for peaceable journey.


    Warning about traveling through New York airports

    From NRA:

    The District Attorney in Albany County and Queens 18 months ago issued an order to arrest anyone coming through the airports with a handgun in their luggage, regardless if the handgun was being transported properly by FAA regulations. The criteria is if you do not have a NY license, you are charged. So what's happening is 2 different scenarios:

    1. People are flying into New York from other states, most but not all of whom have carry permits from their home states, and are carrying a pistol. When they go to fly home, they declare the gun, which has always been unloaded and locked up properly in their checked luggage, but if they cannot produce a NY license, they are promptly charged with illegal weapon possession, and their gun confiscated forever. (The Albany airport sheriff has been doing it as a lower class misdemeanor, the LaGuardia cases were charged as a felony.) As their home state permit is not reciprocal, and they were in NY state for an amount of time carrying a handgun, this group is screwed.

    2. People are DRIVING to the airport from another state where the NY airport is their closest one to fly out of, and are getting popped right off the bat an hour or two from their home. In these cases, we are going to war for them being covered by FOPA, even the Sheriff's office and TSA in Albany have argued over that with the DA, but he won't budge. He did, however, blink on the two cases from Albany, with the people getting a walk. Didn't get their guns back, though, either time.

    Bottom line, UNLESS you are in possession of a VALID New York pistol license, DO NOT bring a handgun in your luggage to the airport, you will be charged.

    This is not being done in any other state in the country except at Logan international in Boston, (same thing there) but even at O'Hare in Illinois, if you come in from another state and meet FAA guidelines, they feel you are covered by FOPA and off you go a happy camper.

    Reminder to Travelers of Requirements for Transporting Firearms, Firearm Parts and Ammunition on Commercial Aircraft

    1. Passengers are prohibited from carrying firearms, firearm parts and ammunition. Federal regulations administered by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) prohibit the carriage of firearms and guns, as well as parts of firearms and guns (such as magazines or clips, bolts, firing pins, and other components), in the traveler's possession or in carry-on luggage on commercial aircraft. Ammunition also is NOT allowed as a carry-on item. Carrying even a single round of ammunition through airport security checkpoints is a violation of regulations. TSA regulations are strictly enforced. Violations can result in criminal prosecution and imposition of civil penalties of up to 10.000 per violation.

    2. Checked baggage requirements for transporting firearms and ammunition. All persons carrying firearms and ammunition in checked baggage, including Law Enforcement Officers, must comply with the provisions of 49 CFR § 1540.111. Following is a summary of key requirements of this section and other regulatory provisions.
    * All firearms must be declared to the air carrier during the ticket counter check-in process. Travelers with firearms should check-in at the ticket counter and not use electronic check-in (e.g., kiosks or the Internet).
    * All declared firearms must be unloaded and transported in a locked hard-sided container. Travelers are advised to place all firearm parts in a locked hard-sided container to avoid violations.
    * Access to the declared firearm must be restricted, with only the passenger possessing the container combination or key to the lock. In the event TSA must open the container for inspection, it is preferred that the passenger turn over the key or combination to the screener.
    * Any ammunition transported must be placed in checked baggage and securely packed in fiber (such as cardboard), wood or metal boxes or other packaging specifically designed to carry small amounts of ammunition. firearm magazines/clips do not satisfy the packaging requirement unless they provide a complete and secure enclosure of the ammunition (e.g., by securely covering the exposed portions of the magazine or by securely placing the magazine in a pouch, holder, holster or lanyard). The ammunition may also be located in the same hard-sided case as the firearm as long as it is properly packed as described here.
    * It is also recommended that the ammunition package in checked baggage be stabilized, either by tapping it to the interior wall of the bag, or by use of packing material or other means to ensure the ammunition package does not move about the interior of the bag during transportation.
    * Black powder, including Pyrodex, and percussion caps used with black-powder type firearms are not permitted on board aircraft, either as accessible property or in checked baggage.

    Travelers should also contact their air carrier before arrival for check-in regarding its firearm and ammunition policies.

    Additional information about the carriage of firearms, firearm parts and ammunition, as well as other air travel tips, can be found at www.tsa.gov or by contacting the TSA Contact Center toll-free at 1-866-289-9673 or by email at [email protected]

    DIRECT CONTACT/S:
    Jerry Henderson, Federal Security Director, 501-372-8376
    Charles "Chuck" Polk, Stakeholder Manager, 501-912-6028

    Letter from Department of Justice to Congressman Donald Young on this issue.
     
  5. budder

    budder Moderator Staff Member

    NTFS, I have also heard rumors that NY was arresting people whose planes went down in NY (emergency landings, diverted to other airports, maybe even crashes) with guns in their bags, even though they weren't scheduled to land there. Is Dorothy SOL if the tornado blows her uncle's shotgun with her to NY?
     
  6. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    I sincerely doubt this was in a Department of Justice letter to a Congressman.

    Got a link to the letter?
     
  7. N.T.F.S.

    N.T.F.S. Active Member

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    Here is the link to the website. http://www.nysrpa.org/airportwarning.htm
    I don't think it was a letter from the DOJ . I remember reading something like this in the NRA magazine



    Here is something else about NJ from a year and a half ago.
    http://njcsd.org/index.php?option=com_c ... 9&Itemid=2
     
  8. ber950

    ber950 Active Member

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    Also be aware of company policy. If your employer is buying the tickets and they have a no weapons policy you can be fired.
     
  9. misawa

    misawa New Member

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    Yeah, that kind of policy would pretty much be a deal breaker for me. Especially if there's going to be some a lot of traveling involved.