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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys! Finally got my first pistol (well first gun actually). It's a S&W Sigma 9 (SW9VE) - I am happy with the purchase thus far. It's a good looking gun, got it from a guy over at ODT (not sure if he's here, if so, Hi!) - Got it for $250, think I got a pretty good deal considering I got the gun, original case, two mags, and Uncle Mike's holster (for when I get to carry!) Right after I picked the gun up, I got a package of Remington 9mm Luger 115gr. (any help with this is appreciated as well). By the time I picked up my boy from his great gramma's and dropped him off at his pop-pop's (us Georgians have odd names for our relatives, no? lol) it was too late for me to try the beauty out! So I sit here anticipating when I will be able to shoot a few rounds! I was wondering if anyone knew any laws about shooting in your backyard? We're on about 2 acres but it's not a sub-div or anything, just a little neighborhood. Should I refrain and try to find someplace else?

I thank you all so much!

(also any direction on inexpensive accessories [lights, other holsters, grips, etc] for this baby would be indubitably appreciated!)
 

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It sounds like you're in an unincorporated area. If so, go to municode.com, look up your county, and in the search box enter "firearm". That should return any county codes related to restrictions on firing on your property.

You can likely also do it by going to your county's website.
 

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If this is your first gun, I would suggest investing in some time with a qualified instructor. You will get more out of this than you would from range time.
 

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Congrats on your new gun. I own a Sigma 40ve. I've had my gun for 2 years now and have around 3000 rounds through it with no problems. These are very reliable guns, but you need to realize that the trigger pull is 12 lbs. Some people hate this gun for that reason. I love it for that reason. You might struggle at first to keep tight groups at the range. I did. Heck you might not even hit the paper on your first try. I didn't. You need to understand that squeezing the trigger the proper way, so that you do not jerk the gun down & to the left is imperative with this gun. Once you get the trigger action down pat you will be able to shoot any gun extremely well.

The heavy trigger pull was designed to simulate the trigger pull of a wheel gun because the thought was that police departments would transition from their revolvers to semi's. The thinking was that they were already used to the heavy revolver triggers. As a self defense gun the heavy trigger might keep you from shooting yourself in the foot as you draw your gun under stress. I would rather carry a 12 lbs. trigger than a 2 lbs. trigger as an SD gun for that reason. I've seen too many people put their finger on the trigger as they draw. That scares me.

...As a disclaimer I should note that I carry Glocks. This gun doesn't get much action except at the range. But I would trust my life with this gun if needed & not be worried about it's reliability.
 

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ET. said:
As a self defense gun the heavy trigger might keep you from shooting yourself in the foot as you draw your gun under stress..
I have to disagree here. Proper training is what will keep you from doing so. During your draw, your finger should not be in the trigger guard. You don't put you finger in the trigger guard until after you have drawn, aimed/pointed and are ready to fire.

Again, it falls back to training.
 

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Congrats on your purchase! Here's a good video about shooting pistols. I've been shooting for many years, and learned a few things:

.

Be safe and have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Got to the range on Valentines day with my better half. We both put some rounds in and needless to say, I definitely need more practice! :)

My "groups" (for lack of better term) were pretty spaced out, assuming it's just trying to get used to the trigger pull of the sigma 9. Packed a little more punch than I expected (more-so than my cousins XD40, it seems) - Either way it was enjoyable. Now to start saving for my GWL. I guess anyone that I help here with my services proceeds will go toward GWL and GCO membership :D Hart Co. has a $15 for fingerprinting, a $40 for background and additional $31 for "issue"? Meh, donations welcome :p :lol:
 

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Hi Xport7,

At least two companys make spring sets for the Sigma -low cost & will give you a much nicer trigger pull.
With some practice,you will learn how to fire tight groups with the stock trigger too.

It is a very accurate pistol.

PLEASE read up on how to fire a firearm from a holster/ draw!
If you do it improperly you &othersaround you WILL be in DANGER!

Your finger NEVER enters the trigger guard till it is pointed at the target. PRACTICE the correct method & you will never have problem.

Best,
broomhandle
 

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Congrats! The Sigma is a good gun, but heavy on the trigger as others have said. But so is a double action revolver, so that's not really a problem. Get training from some professional trainers (or at least a very experienced friend to start), shoot as much as you can, and you'll be all set.
 

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Adam5 said:
ET. said:
As a self defense gun the heavy trigger might keep you from shooting yourself in the foot as you draw your gun under stress..
I have to disagree here. Proper training is what will keep you from doing so. During your draw, your finger should not be in the trigger guard. You don't put you finger in the trigger guard until after you have drawn, aimed/pointed and are ready to fire.

Again, it falls back to training.
I am a big advocate of proper training. I've seen what happens when someone handles a gun with no training. People get hurt (or worse). The problem is that accidents happen in spite of training. You can train all day, every day for your whole life, but if the trigger gets snagged on a shirt or something else, then training isn't going to stop the gun from firing. It happens. It just happened to a police officer & hit the you tube circuit. A 12 lbs trigger pull can keep someone from shooting himself in the foot if a situation occurs where the trigger is snagged while reholstering or if it hits something as it is falling. If a gun has a 2 lbs trigger pull & no external safety (except for the trigger safety) it doesn't take a lot of pressure to fire the gun. Yes training is the best deterrent for unintended shootings, but a heavy trigger pull is part of the equation.
 

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ET. said:
Adam5 said:
[quote="ET.":2vi2ldp6]As a self defense gun the heavy trigger might keep you from shooting yourself in the foot as you draw your gun under stress..
I have to disagree here. Proper training is what will keep you from doing so. During your draw, your finger should not be in the trigger guard. You don't put you finger in the trigger guard until after you have drawn, aimed/pointed and are ready to fire.

Again, it falls back to training.
I am a big advocate of proper training. I've seen what happens when someone handles a gun with no training. People get hurt (or worse). The problem is that accidents happen in spite of training. You can train all day, every day for your whole life, but if the trigger gets snagged on a shirt or something else, then training isn't going to stop the gun from firing. It happens. It just happened to a police officer & hit the you tube circuit. A 12 lbs trigger pull can keep someone from shooting himself in the foot if a situation occurs where the trigger is snagged while reholstering or if it hits something as it is falling. If a gun has a 2 lbs trigger pull & no external safety (except for the trigger safety) it doesn't take a lot of pressure to fire the gun. Yes training is the best deterrent for unintended shootings, but a heavy trigger pull is part of the equation.[/quote:2vi2ldp6]

If the trigger is snagged while re-holstering then I personally feel that it is the shooters own fault. If somebody tries to catch a loaded gun from dropping then they are being an idiot. They weren't conscious as to what was near their trigger guard. If they follow the 4 golden rules then there is nothing to really worry about. I may be young dude at 24 but these past few years that I have carried and shot, these rules have kept me out of any type of trouble in regards to safety. My first firearm was a Glock 19 when I was 21.
 

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almost a dozen responses so far and no one's done it?
:ttiwwp:
 

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If you are having issues with the trigger, there is a "fix" than you can do in the comfort of your own home with some basic tools. It involves removing one of the two springs in the trigger. Glock sued S&W claiming that S&W's Sigma "borrowed" heavily from the Glock. They added an extra spring to the trigger that is in all ways superfluous to the function of the gun.

You can google "Sigma trigger job" to find articles and videos about fixing it.

Since you did buy it used, there's a good chance that the previous owner did it for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I removed the pigtail spring. Not sure of the other spring I'm able to remove. I haven't shot yet since doing this but I have dry fired several times and the trigger pull definitely feels slightly lighter. As far as safety goes, I have a little boy (turning 1 today actually) that I want to see grow up, that (beyond anything else, of course there are other reasons) is my reason for being safe :) - When the gun is loaded, my finger NEVER enters the trigger guard until I am pointing at what I want to shoot. I understand carelessness is the epitome of accidents.
 
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