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Tactical Statistician
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What are the sheep thinking?

[URL=http://www.onlineathens.com/stories/100407/cops_20071004021.shtml said:
OnlineAthens.com[/URL]]Fake cop pulls over driver in Bethlehem
Story updated at 11:45 PM on Wednesday, October 3, 2007

Authorities are on the lookout for a man posing as a Walton County sheriff's deputy who pulled over a motorist Tuesday night in Barrow County.

Capt. Murray Kogod of the Barrow County Sheriff's Office said the man was driving a black Ford Taurus when he pulled over a woman driving on Georgia Highway 11 near Star Street in Bethlehem about 7:30 p.m. Tuesday.

The man said he needed to see the woman's driver's license, Social Security card and a credit card for identification, then took them back to the Taurus, which had a flashing red light on the dashboard, police said. All law enforcement vehicles in Barrow County have blue lights, Kogod said.

The fake deputy drove off without returning the woman's cards, Kogod said.

The man was not wearing a gun belt, but did have a belt with a knife attached, the victim told Barrow investigators.

Kogod said anyone who feels uncertain when a vehicle behind them is attempting to pull them over should drive to a well-lit area where people are and call 911 to verify that they're being pulled over by a real law enforcement officer. Barrow deputies call in to the county's communications center each time they make a traffic stop, he said.

Published in the Athens Banner-Herald on 100407
 

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Sure I'll keep driving to a well-lit area. I just won't do it in Centerville, GA:

http://www.insideedition.com/ourstories ... toryid=182

Grandma Betty in the Slammer!

Getting pulled over by the police late at night can be a very scary experience, especially if it's unclear whether those flashing lights belong to a real cop. Betty Golden, a 69-year-old grandmother of eight, says she followed the advice she had heard in news reports -- she acknowledged the police, but did not pull over till she thought it was safe. However, it's that same advice that got the grandmother into a heap of trouble. Not only was she pulled over, she was even charged with a crime!

Betty talked with INSIDE EDITION senior correspondent, Matt Meagher. "I'm scared, just like I was scared the night that I was stopped," Betty says.

Her nightmare began on this lonely road in Centerville, Ga., as she was driving home late at night from the supermarket. She saw blue lights flashing behind her, and heard a siren, but says she wasn't sure it was the real police. Betty had seen news stories about phony cops pulling people over - robbing, raping, and even killing them. She recalled the advice from those stories that said slow down, put on your emergency flashers, and look for a populated, well-lit area to pull over. Betty says that the dash cam video from the police cruiser that pulled her over shows she did just that.

"They had to know I was not fleeing, you don't flee at ten miles under the speed limit with your emergency flashers on," a disbelieving Betty tells INSIDE EDITION.

When another marked police car pulled next to her, she pulled over. But what Betty didn't realize was she was in for the shock of her life.

"Get out of the car, open the door, unlock the door, open the door, open the door," yelled the police officer. With a gun pointed just inches from her head, Betty says she was so frightened and nervous that she had trouble opening the door. "Do not make me break the window and pull you out of the car," the policeman continued.

Betty was terrified, and says, "He could tell I wasn't any danger to him, and I think how easily that officer could have shot me."

Betty went to trial on her charges, and was convicted of fleeing and interference with a police officer because she didn't open the car door fast enough. Believe it or not she was found not guilty of the original charge of failure to maintain a lane, the reason she was pulled over in the first place.
Betty has never before been arrested, and has never even gotten a ticket!

Betty's mug shot and fingerprints were taken. She was sentenced to ten days in jail and one year probation. Distraught and tearful, Betty says, "I will have a police record to leave my grandchildren, and maybe nobody else would really understand that except a grandmother."

For two years Betty and her husband, Byron, fought the charges and spent more than $25,000 on legal bills. But last month, all of her appeals were exhausted. Betty was ordered to report to jail for ten nights, though she was allowed to go home during the day.

INSIDE EDITION was with her as she left her home for the seven-mile drive to the jail, right past the spot where she was arrested.

As she made the short walk to the jail, her husband Byron says he wishes he could do more to help. "She's just a very good lady and she doesn't deserve this," Byron tells INSIDE EDITION. Byron even volunteered to stay 30 days instead of his wife, but the sheriff's department would not allow it.

With a few more steps, Betty entered the sheriff's office to start her sentence. She enters with the support of family and the words of her son to give her strength: "Mom, you don't know how proud I am of you you've fought the fight. You stood up for your rights. You will get through this but remember, I am very proud of you."

Betty finished her sentence this week but she's not done with the legal system, she still has to complete one year of probation.
 

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I read that story about Ms. Golden a while back when her case was still ongoing. I thought she would end up beating the charges. Guess I was wrong.

From what I could tell from the earlier articles, and this one as well, it seems as if she did exactly what the police tell you to do if you have some concern about it being a legitimate stop, but was punished for doing so. While I haven't seen the police video, this appears to be a travesty of justice.
 

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a call to 911 as everything is happening cant hurt. The times I have been pulled over usually took the officer an average of 5 minutes to approach the vehicle. I guess he ran my tags and waited to make sure nothing came back. That 5 minutes could help. However in this case she didnt seem to have that time.
 

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jgullock, I am glad that she is safe. If I were in that situation, I have no idea what I'd do. My car doesn't accelerate fast enough to try to escape and there's no way I'd try to draw on the trigger-happy cop (why else would he have his gun out? Even if he was a rookie, his nervousness is just as dangerous). Though, there was a similar situation I saw in a FATS run through, with the driver reaching into the glove compartment and pulling a gun, then chambering a round (clearly only morons carry C3 ;)), then shooting at the officers. Most officers took a really long time to respond, so long that that if the guy had been carrying C1, they would've gotten shot. But that's not a chance I'm willing to take.
 

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budder said:
jgullock, I am glad that she is safe. If I were in that situation, I have no idea what I'd do. My car doesn't accelerate fast enough to try to escape and there's no way I'd try to draw on the trigger-happy cop
What the "Ultimate Driving Machine" of yours doesn't have enough zip for you?
 

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tace said:
budder said:
jgullock, I am glad that she is safe. If I were in that situation, I have no idea what I'd do. My car doesn't accelerate fast enough to try to escape and there's no way I'd try to draw on the trigger-happy cop
What the "Ultimate Driving Machine" of yours doesn't have enough zip for you?
I think something a little bit bigger than a 1.8L engine is needed ;)
 

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budder said:
tace said:
budder said:
jgullock, I am glad that she is safe. If I were in that situation, I have no idea what I'd do. My car doesn't accelerate fast enough to try to escape and there's no way I'd try to draw on the trigger-happy cop
What the "Ultimate Driving Machine" of yours doesn't have enough zip for you?
I think something a little bit bigger than a 1.8L engine is needed ;)
Rubbish. My little 1.8L krautwagen could give a Crown Vic a good run for its money, and I know I could kill 'em in the turns...
 

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ThetaReactor said:
budder said:
tace said:
budder said:
jgullock, I am glad that she is safe. If I were in that situation, I have no idea what I'd do. My car doesn't accelerate fast enough to try to escape and there's no way I'd try to draw on the trigger-happy cop
What the "Ultimate Driving Machine" of yours doesn't have enough zip for you?
I think something a little bit bigger than a 1.8L engine is needed ;)
Rubbish. My little 1.8L krautwagen could give a Crown Vic a good run for its money, and I know I could kill 'em in the turns...
Who said anything about outrunning a Crown Vic. I'm worried about outrunning bullets!
 

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jgullock said:
Sure I'll keep driving to a well-lit area. I just won't do it in Centerville, GA:

http://www.insideedition.com/ourstories ... toryid=182

. . . Betty had seen news stories about phony cops pulling people over - robbing, raping, and even killing them. She recalled the advice from those stories that said slow down, put on your emergency flashers, and look for a populated, well-lit area to pull over. Betty says that the dash cam video from the police cruiser that pulled her over shows she did just that.

"They had to know I was not fleeing, you don't flee at ten miles under the speed limit with your emergency flashers on," a disbelieving Betty tells INSIDE EDITION.
THis is not just advice on a news story. In Georgia, it is a state statute.
 

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After reading that story from Centerville, GA, there has to be more to that story. First of all, I would like to think that my fellow officers would not arrest a seventy year old grandmother for not stopping immediately. Second, for that matter, I would hope that they would give the benefit of the doubt to anyone who said they were afraid to stop immediately if they slowed down and pulled to a lit area.

Also, the fact that she appealed the conviction all the way through the legal system and was DENIED everytime says her story sounds a little fishy. If she is being completely honest, surely a judge somewhere would have intervened.
 

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GACop said:
After reading that story from Centerville, GA, there has to be more to that story. First of all, I would like to think that my fellow officers would not arrest a seventy year old grandmother for not stopping immediately. Second, for that matter, I would hope that they would give the benefit of the doubt to anyone who said they were afraid to stop immediately if they slowed down and pulled to a lit area.

Also, the fact that she appealed the conviction all the way through the legal system and was DENIED everytime says her story sounds a little fishy. If she is being completely honest, surely a judge somewhere would have intervened.
This is exactly what I was thinking too. Wonder what grandma was up to?
 

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Malum Prohibitum said:
jgullock said:
Sure I'll keep driving to a well-lit area. I just won't do it in Centerville, GA:

http://www.insideedition.com/ourstories ... toryid=182

. . . Betty had seen news stories about phony cops pulling people over - robbing, raping, and even killing them. She recalled the advice from those stories that said slow down, put on your emergency flashers, and look for a populated, well-lit area to pull over. Betty says that the dash cam video from the police cruiser that pulled her over shows she did just that.

"They had to know I was not fleeing, you don't flee at ten miles under the speed limit with your emergency flashers on," a disbelieving Betty tells INSIDE EDITION.
THis is not just advice on a news story. In Georgia, it is a state statute.
Apparently, this statute did not exist yet. It may have been introduced in response to this lady's conviction for fleeing and attempting to elude, which was upheld by the Court of Appeals.
 

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Here is the meat of the opinion. Golden v. State, 276 Ga.App. 538, 623 S.E.2d 727 (2005).

The evidence shows that, after a uniformed police officer in a marked police vehicle gave Golden visual and audio signals to stop in compliance with OCGA § 40-6-395(a), she failed or refused to stop for a substantial distance despite acknowledging she was aware of the signals, and that she did not stop until she was forced to do so by a second officer using a rolling roadblock maneuver. After considering Golden's explanation for her failure or refusal to stop, the jury nevertheless concluded that she acted wilfully in violation of OCGA § 40-6-395(a). We find the evidence was sufficient for a rational trier of fact to find that all the elements of the statute were proved beyond a reasonable doubt, and that Golden was guilty of wilfully failing or refusing to stop her car in violation of OCGA § 40-6-395(a).

Under OCGA § 16-10-24(a), “a person who knowingly and willfully obstructs or hinders any law enforcement officer in the lawful discharge of his official duties is guilty of a misdemeanor.†Unlike the felony obstruction provisions of OCGA § 16-10-24(b), which require proof that the obstruction was accomplished “by offering or doing violence to the person†of the law enforcement officer, the misdemeanor obstruction provisions of OCGA § 16-10-24(a) do not require proof of violence, the threat of violence, or the use or threat of force. It follows that verbal exchanges which convey no threat of force or violence, but which otherwise obstruct or hinder a law enforcement officer in the lawful discharge of his official duties, can authorize a conviction for misdemeanor obstruction under OCGA § 16-10-24(a). “Argument, flight, stubborn obstinance, and lying are all examples of conduct that may satisfy the obstruction [or hindrance] element†of OCGA § 16-10-24(a). Pinchon v. State, 237 Ga.App. 675, 676, 516 S.E.2d 537 (1999).

The evidence shows that Golden was lawfully stopped by the officers using a rolling roadblock after she failed or refused to stop when she was signaled to stop by the pursuing officer. The officers were acting in the lawful discharge of their official duties when they forcibly stopped Golden at 1:30 a.m. and approached her car with weapons drawn for their own safety. Golden was aware that she had been stopped by uniformed police officers, yet she ignored repeated commands by Officer Phillips to open the car door, to exit the car, and to give the officer her driver's license and proof of insurance. Instead, she remained seated in the car, rolled down her window, complained to the officers that she was being harassed, and called 911 to complain about the officers. Whether under these circumstances Golden's refusal to comply with Officer Phillips's repeated commands hindered or obstructed the officer in the lawful discharge of his official duties was for the trier of fact to decide. We find the evidence was sufficient for a rational trier of fact to find that Golden was guilty beyond a reasonable doubt of misdemeanor obstruction in violation of OCGA § 16-10-24(a).
 
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