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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Need some ideas on how to make extracting cases easier from my revolvers. When I first got my Taurus 82, the spent cases would slide out without requiring any pressing of the extractor rod. Now it requires almost full extension of the extractor to release the rounds, but unfired rounds fall out without the use of the extractor. My Taurus 66 requires full extension of the extractor to release the spent cases, and the unfired cases slide out kind of slowly or sometimes get stuck and require me tapping it for it to release.

Is it possible to safely do this myself, without shipping it off or taking it to a smith?

I've read up online about it and got some ideas:

- Use a drill and chuck the brass .38/.357 cleaning brush into it and run it through each cylinder for a few seconds. This is more of an issue if deposits build up and a thorough cleaning doesn't fix it, at least from what I've read.

- Get a .40 caliber mop brush, put some metal polish (Flitz or Mother's) on it, chuck it in a drill and run it through the cylinders for a few seconds. This way you don't remove much metal.

- Put some very fine grit sand paper on a thin wooden dowel and spin it through each cylinder by hand. I'm not too comfortable with this, as my hands aren't that steady and I'd be afraid of removing too much metal.

I'm ok with the first two ideas, but if y'all have any other ideas let me know. I understand that I may be asking for something that isn't designed to happen, just curious if I can improve how it currently is.
 

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I watch the watchers
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I read recently that the guy who's marketing the AA-12 automatic shotgun says that the unburned carbon particles act like graphite to lubricate the AA-12. Maybe you should try and see just how much carbon you can accumulate.

It might work.













.... and pigs might fly. :lol:
 

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What is sticking .38 or .357 cases or both?
Is this a regular carry or a range only gun?

If the ammo is clean and the chambers are clean, push a lightly oiled patch through each chamber. My thought is that maybe you've got random carry crud and no lube left.

If that doesn't get it, then stop shooting lacquered steel cases or reduce the power of your hand loads. :shattered:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
45_Fan said:
What is sticking .38 or .357 cases or both?
Is this a regular carry or a range only gun?

If the ammo is clean and the chambers are clean, push a lightly oiled patch through each chamber. My thought is that maybe you've got random carry crud and no lube left.

If that doesn't get it, then stop shooting lacquered steel cases or reduce the power of your hand loads. :shattered:
Both and both.

I'll give it a good cleaning, perhaps just start with the .38/.357 bore brush hooked to a drill. If that doesn't make it easier, I'll try the polishing with a .40 caliber mop brush.
 

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Atlanta Overwatch
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If you shoot alot of .38 rounds be sure to keep the chambers extra clean, or you could get extraction issues when shooting the longer .357 rounds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've shot almost 50/50 .38 Special and .357 Magnum rounds through it. I've mainly used Atlanta Arms ammo, since Georgia Range & Guns stocks it, and while their ammo is good, it tends have a lot of unburned powder. When I first got it, I had a box of Winchester .38 Special +P rounds that my wife shot through it, and those were the nastiest rounds I've ever seen. The guy at the range said Winchester white box ammo reminds him of shooting a black powder gun.

So I would imagine deposits are a good reason for this. I've never given it a thorough cleaning, just a quick spray with Break Free and quick swipe with a bore brush.

I just wanted to make sure the idea of using a brush/mop with a drill would be a good idea.
 

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I prefer to use some CLP and a small stiff bristle cleaning brush to remove any build up. Then I use a flex shaft buffer (dremel will work also) to polish and the inside of each cylinder with some jewelers rouge compound. This makes it glass smooth and the spent rounds will slide out much easier. Just be sure to clean it thoroughly after every use to prevent the build up from forming again.
 

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Under Scrutiny
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Confederate, get some Lewis lead remover, and put down the drill. :D

I'm serious try the various cleaners first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Didn't make it to the range this week, but should next week. I did a thorough cleaning with a bore brush and Winchester Break Free, and I removed a lot of s***. The cylinders appear much smoother, even when compared to when I first bought it. I assume Taurus test fired it but didn't clean it.
 

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Confederate Tyrant said:
Didn't make it to the range this week, but should next week. I did a thorough cleaning with a bore brush and Winchester Break Free, and I removed a lot of s***. The cylinders appear much smoother, even when compared to when I first bought it. I assume Taurus test fired it but didn't clean it.
35,000 psi in a repeating manner makes stuff smooth too. ;)
Well used train tracks, vice and plier jaws, and hammer and anvil faces all make fine examples of that kind of smoothing.

I'm curious how it goes when you make it to the range.
 
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