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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
15 minutes a day, 5 days a week, 52 weeks per year adds up to 65 hours of training. Way more than any of us can get taking classes or on the range. Dry fire is the foundation upon which exceptional skill is built!

Who has made the self commitment to structured, regular practice?

I spend about 10 minutes doing fine trigger control drills with the help of my Mantis. The other five is one handed with my right and left hands or draws and mag changes based on my mood that night.

My current competition doesnt have any draws or mag changes on the clock so those get less priority for now.
 

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I used to shoot bullseye. I spent many an afternoon after work dry firing at mini b-6 targets I made. I would put it on the wal at the end of the hallway. I haven’t done it in a long time. I lost my nra classification due to inactivity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Nothing so structured, but I draw and point pretty much every day in the hope that my sight picture time improves.
Do you look at the point you are aiming and then make the sights appear aligned with that point? I have also heard Gabe White describe adjusting visual focus to prefocus at the point in space where your front sight will arrive. Basically memorize the feeling of the muscles in your eyes and do thst before your pistol reaches full extension.
 

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Frank, I keep hearing on the news talk radio station, 95.5 FM, ads for the Mantis X dry fire system. I think of you because you've said you have one of these and it's helped you greatly.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Frank, I keep hearing on the news talk radio station, 95.5 FM, ads for the Mantis X dry fire system. I think of you because you've said you have one of these and it's helped you greatly.
They do advertise a lot. Must be popular to be getting that traction.

It has been a useful tool for me. Like having a trigger discipline coach in your pocket, which is great. Here is the data from my latest dry fire practice - a few minutes ago - with my G34. Did have to rack the slide between each and reestablish my grip. It even detected what would have been my one flyer for the string (the lower score one). Shows movement, cant, and lots of other data to help figure out what you just did.

I also use its ability to play a ding on good shots and a buzzer on bad. Let's me "ring steel" in the basement without looking at my phone. Immediate feedback while I am doing my follow through and sight calling practice.

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Some may say that this is an unneccesary gadget and one should just buy more ammo. However, this cost less than a case of 9mm ammo and I have already used it to train more than 34,658 shots (some of those were getting data on live fire). The app keeps a running total. For the sake of argument let's say that 1800 of those were real shots at the range. This means this device has given my objective external feedback on 32,858 practice shots, which if done at the range with real ammo which would have cost at current prices $13,143.20. Yeah, I cannot afford that either.
 

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Do you look at the point you are aiming and then make the sights appear aligned with that point? I have also heard Gabe White describe adjusting visual focus to prefocus at the point in space where your front sight will arrive. Basically memorize the feeling of the muscles in your eyes and do thst before your pistol reaches full extension.
Yes, then focus on the front site, then evaluate how long it took, my grip, and whether I should have done anything differently.

Then I repeat and change anything that might have needed changing, and then I repeat it several more times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This might be something you’d be interested in.
I think I definitely would be interested. It is not clear how one actually competes in EIC matches. I presume some of them would be at the CMP in Talladega but many in other places. It could be very interesting. I am ignorant as to if their service pistol definition includes 9mm or only traditional 45 caliber like bullseye does. Getting good at one handed rimfire shooting and stacking the shots in the 10 ring on a B6 target would be a very challenging sport for sure.
 

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It’s changed quite a bit over the last 15 years or so. CMP pistol used to mean beretta 92 or 1911. The lack of interest in target shooting has led them to allow many other guns. There used to be a limit as to the number of leg matches/year that counted. Not sure if that’s the case now or not.
It’s a more in and out affair compared to the other action sports where you wait around.

 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It’s changed quite a bit over the last 15 years or so. CMP pistol used to mean beretta 92 or 1911. The lack of interest in target shooting has led them to allow many other guns. ...
Very interesting. It turns out I actually already have a CMP competitor number assigned to me. I didn't realize this. Searching the competition tracker doesn't show any nearby pistol matches. Maybe they just have not published all the 2023 matches.

I know what you mean and I am not entirely sure it is all good. There seems to be a bias among gun owners - not just the casual ones - against target shooting and marksmanship instead of whatever passes for acceptable marksmanship at self defense distances. People shoot a group at 3 yards with half the shots missing and pat them selves on the back for their combat accuracy. (I am just light heartedly poking fun of course).
 
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