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Went to the Dr. yesterday for a quarterly checkup. The day before I got a reminder from their office about the visit and was told to bring in all my prescriptions for the dr. to review. This was the first time they had asked me to bring in my prescriptions so I was curious as to why.

Anyway, I was in the exam room getting my blood pressure, pulse, etc. checked by the nurse before the dr. come in, I ask her what’s the deal with bringing in the prescriptions. She went on to explain the reason the dr. wanted to see them is because they were getting feedback from patients (I guess) that the pharmacies were filling the wrong prescription, wrong dosage, wrong usage, etc. and they wanted to make sure everyone’s medicine was correct.

To me I place this issues squarely on all doctors and not on the pharmacy. Have you ever tried to read the prescription on the paper they give you to give to the pharmacy, it looks like some other language besides English. No wonder the pharmacies get it wrong sometimes it is amazing they don’t get it wrong a lot more.

I am amazed more pharmacist don’t require them prescription to be clearly legible so more errors are not made. I bet if they started rejecting to fill the prescription until the dr. wrote it clearly, this would fix the problem.

Just a rant and an observation.
 

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Now days I don't even get a written prescription. They are just sent to the pharmacy electronically, but the old written scripts were actually pretty legible. A lot of it was in Latin shorthand designed to be quick to write and easy for the pharmacist to read but difficult for the general public.
 

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Most of my prescriptions in recent years are also sent electronically. When I have gotten a paper script, it is computer printed and then just signed by the dr.
 

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Atlanta Overwatch
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Most of my prescriptions in recent years are also sent electronically. When I have gotten a paper script, it is computer printed and then just signed by the dr.
This.

All of mine are sent electronically, except if I get a narcotic. Those are computer printed and signed by the doctor.
 

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Token Liberal Hippie
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There's been a big push for providers to stop using shorthand and write out what they mean, on orders and prescriptions. The Joint Commission will hammer you hard if they catch you using qd, qod, MSO4, MgSO4, and many, many others.
 

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It's a little more sinister than this. It's part of the DEA cracking down on "doctor shopping".... Does not affect me, as I have four different doctors who do communicate. I also bring a listing of all active prescriptions I am taking so I do not have any contraindications. All of mine, except pain meds, are sent electronically.
 

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Romans 10:13
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I find it hard to believe that any doctor could look at the medication and determine if that, is indeed, the correct medication. With all the generics on the market that come in different shapes and colors, I would think that is impossible to do.
 

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I watch the watchers
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As I'm now on daily meds, I keep a list of them on my phone and update it every time anything changes. There's also a backup email I've sent to myself with the same info.
 

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Token Liberal Hippie
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I find it hard to believe that any doctor could look at the medication and determine if that, is indeed, the correct medication. With all the generics on the market that come in different shapes and colors, I would think that is impossible to do.
There's a great app for that, where you can put in color, shape, and imprint and it tells you what pill it is. Awesome for identifying potential overdose vectors.

Also I think you missed the point. The point is not for the OP's doctor to look at the pills themselves and identify them; it's to ensure compatibility among prescribing doctors and make sure he's not on two beta blockers or something similar, and to make sure he's taking what he should be taking.
 

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Token Liberal Hippie
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As I'm now on daily meds, I keep a list of them on my phone and update it every time anything changes. There's also a backup email I've sent to myself with the same info.
If you have an iPhone you can put all of that (plus allergies, doctors, PMHx, and emergency contacts) in to the Health app and it will be available on your Lock screen without having to unlock the device. So we can see it if you can't talk.
 

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American
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I find it hard to believe that any doctor could look at the medication and determine if that, is indeed, the correct medication. With all the generics on the market that come in different shapes and colors, I would think that is impossible to do.
Not hard in the least. But this is an effort to "coordinate care" and thereby reduce the overhead of the insurance companies.
 

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GeePeeDoHolic
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If you have an iPhone you can put all of that (plus allergies, doctors, PMHx, and emergency contacts) in to the Health app and it will be available on your Lock screen without having to unlock the device. So we can see it if you can't talk.
I could swear that Medications section was not there last time I looked. Did they add it in an update?
 

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Gun pecan
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There's been a big push for providers to stop using shorthand and write out what they mean, on orders and prescriptions. The Joint Commission will hammer you hard if they catch you using qd, qod, MSO4, MgSO4, and many, many others.
Plus the SALADS will screw you over.
 

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Romans 10:13
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There's a great app for that, where you can put in color, shape, and imprint and it tells you what pill it is. Awesome for identifying potential overdose vectors.

Also I think you missed the point. The point is not for the OP's doctor to look at the pills themselves and identify them; it's to ensure compatibility among prescribing doctors and make sure he's not on two beta blockers or something similar, and to make sure he's taking what he should be taking.
I hadn't thought about an app but your point is a good one. I never bring my meds with me and when they ask what I am taking I simply tell them. No one has ever asked me why I didn't actually bring my meds with me.

Most meds are now escribed or efaxed to the pharmacy these days. I'm sure this cuts down on medication errors.
 

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American
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I hadn't thought about an app but your point is a good one. I never bring my meds with me and when they ask what I am taking I simply tell them. No one has ever asked me why I didn't actually bring my meds with me.

Most meds are now escribed or efaxed to the pharmacy these days. I'm sure this cuts down on medication errors.
It does. Some can't be done that way because of the schedule drug involved (narcotics, etc.) but routines are typically done electronically by all but the oldest practitioners these days.
 

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Romans 10:13
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It does. Some can't be done that way because of the schedule drug involved (narcotics, etc.) but routines are typically done electronically by all but the oldest practitioners these days.
I am aware that narcotics require a paper script. That's why I said most meds. But your point is well taken.
 

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Token Liberal Hippie
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I could swear that Medications section was not there last time I looked. Did they add it in an update?
You're right, I imagined that. I do keep my meds in the "medical notes" section as I take a couple that have... unfortunate interactions.
 

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Token Liberal Hippie
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GeePeeDoHolic
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You're right, I imagined that. I do keep my meds in the "medical notes" section as I take a couple that have... unfortunate interactions.
There is a dedicated Medications section now. That was not there last time I looked, probably iOS8 or 9.
 
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