Doorbell Camera's are they any good?

Discussion in 'Off-topic' started by xls177, Sep 8, 2019.

  1. xls177

    xls177 Member

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    Anybody use a doorbell camera?
    I was wondering if they are really as good as they claim.
    I was hoping to get one without fee's for video storage.
    Reviews are all over the board good and bad.

    I see ring cost $3 a month or 30 a year for video storage.
    Nest is $5 a month

    Do they keep copies of all the audio and video ? like to sell or share with 3rd parties
     
  2. Nemo

    Nemo Man of Myth and Legend

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    As I understand, many of them include sharing with police. Barring your specific request no to do so. They just want to make sure they know what time you leave, come home, drive, quick peek at condition and who with and all those things the govt just need to keep an eye on. Just because . . ..

    Get one you deal with the storage and disks and all that stuff.

    Nemo
     

  3. Groundhound

    Groundhound Active Member

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    I have a nest, it is $50/yr for 5 days continuous storage. You can create clips to keep indefinitely. In addition to doorbell video/audio functions, you can set it to alert via the app on person detection and facial recognition within zones you create. It also can be set to alert on any motion and sound, but I find this gives too many false positives so I keep that alert off.

    Edited to add: Upload bandwidth is about 4.6 GB/day, something to consider if you are on a data cap.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2019
  4. OWM

    OWM Well-Known Member

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    Why would you want to put something in your house that you will be pressured into sharing with the local police. Even if you say no the police know you have one and will get the video with or without your permission(warrant) if they deem it important. Ring even goes so far as to provide scripts to the police to use on you to convince you to go along. You need to research this in depth before doing it. There is a lot of information out there with some of it being good and some bad. Better yet make your own system that answers to you and you alone.
     
  5. Groundhound

    Groundhound Active Member

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    The privacy concern here extends to any security camera that uploads to a remote service, not just doorbell cams. Upload to a remote server allows the user to see and respond to activities via an integrated app in real time while they are away from home, not just see what happened after the fact.

    Ring (Amazon) has their Neighbors app that allows users to share video feeds from their cameras to other app users, including the police. AFAIK the Neighbors app is a separate feature from the Ring app -I think anyone can use the Neighbors app regardless of whether they have a Ring camera or not. I can see where Amazon especially finds it in their interest to involve police in monitoring areas where package delivery occurs. They risk having their entire Ring camera product line business collapse if ever users found they were being monitored without their consent.

    Nest (Google) also allows third party sharing of live video feeds via password secured link to whomever the user wants, but I’ve noticed that Google has dumbed that down somewhat in that the shared feed only goes on for a few seconds before it switches over to an ad for Nest. I guess Google hasn’t figured out how to monetize this ability yet.
     
  6. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    Why would you want anything in your house that has the possibility of being compromised by a 3rd party through the "internet of things?" Particularly where cloud servers are involved. I don't need my refrigerator telling me when I'm out of eggs or getting turned off. I don't need my thermostat running the risk of being set to 95* in January. I don't need a box sitting on the coffee table constantly monitoring conversations even when it's supposedly turned off.

    Haven't we learned yet from the likes of OnStar and even our PCs and such?
     
    zetor likes this.
  7. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

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    You can lock Nest thermostat so it can't be altered by anyone other than those with the pass code that you personally set.

    My question is do you have to use the record service provided by Ring or other door bell cameras? Is it possible to record to your own server and by pass the cloud service that they share with police?
     
  8. Groundhound

    Groundhound Active Member

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    Good thing none of us carry anything around in our pockets that have cameras and microphones! :p
     
  9. Nemo

    Nemo Man of Myth and Legend

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    Getting worse than you think Groundhound. Soon all people will be chipped at birth. And of course it will have some type of explosive to let you bleed to death or poison or something.

    Nemo

    https://www.cnet.com/news/google-ne...king-camera-for-your-home-weve-got-questions/


     
  10. Nemo

    Nemo Man of Myth and Legend

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  11. Groundhound

    Groundhound Active Member

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    Yes, I may be doomed. As I sit before my home office desk I have 7 cameras and 5 microphones in various devices all within an arm’s reach of me. I take small solace in the knowledge that only 2 of the cameras are aimed in my general direction, because even though I think they are off, who knows for sure? Aaaack, what to do? The problem could be that I have eyeholes cut in my tinfoil headwrap, I need another layer. “Hey Google, set my oven for the proper temperature and time for roast Groundhound brain, well done”. That’s all for now, I must move to the kitchen....
     
  12. Nemo

    Nemo Man of Myth and Legend

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    Well, at least we all will get to see you bake, live and in color. Whether you want to do it or want it broadcast publicly. And just to show you're not crazy, they will strip your foil off of you.

    Nemo
     
  13. Groundhound

    Groundhound Active Member

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    Actually I was pretty tasty, just a bit overdone. Good thing I - like most men - have a second brain with which to function. Its always been in charge anyway.
     
  14. OWM

    OWM Well-Known Member

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    Don't bet on that. I will try to find the video I saw awhile back of someone hacking into the nest by way of the home wireless router. The router was not secured well and the nest was pass coded. The hacker used a small Linux tool to shoot right past the code and took control of the nest. The nest security is one thing the router is the key. You say why would someone want to hack my nest? It is the modern version of placing a M80 in your mailbox. All you need is a laptop some knowledge you got at school and just drive around the neighbor hood looking for weak routers. There are some members here who know very well what I speak of.
     
  15. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    I don't.
     
  16. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    They all use cloud servers for "safety and security" purposes. No, really! :rotfl2:

    Cloud servers are accessible by anyone with the proper credentials. Depending on the company, it could be dozens or thousands of people with access to your information and there's nothing you can do about it.
     
  17. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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  18. Groundhound

    Groundhound Active Member

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    This weakness I think, stems from the wifi password entry interface on the Nest thermostat. It is on the thermostat itself and is slow and clumsy, possibly tempting the user to use a weak/short wifi password. If installing a Nest thermostat (I have 2 - like them), tough it out and use a long complicated wifi password on your router. This weakness does not apply to the Nest Hello doorbell cam, which is setup from the app and long, complicated passwords can be copied/pasted.
     
  19. Groundhound

    Groundhound Active Member

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    The reason, as I stated in post #6, is to make it possible to respond via an app to someone on your property while you are away from home, in real time.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2019