Don't Let The Kids Go Outside

Discussion in 'Off-topic' started by Nemo, Aug 6, 2020.

  1. Nemo

    Nemo Man of Myth and Legend

    12,658
    799
    113
    It will get them upset and depressed by reminding them of climate change.

    Nemo

    https://www.weaselzippers.us/453573...because-it-reminds-them-about-climate-change/


     
  2. jsaund22

    jsaund22 Ninjaneering Computers

    2,556
    175
    63
    Bull$#!+.

    Spending time outside stresses the little doughballs out because they'd rather have their eyes glued to a screen.
     
    Bkite and Harhib like this.

  3. Phil1979

    Phil1979 Member Georgia Carry

    11,448
    581
    113
    I'm glad I grew up flying paper and wooden airplanes, playing with ants, riding my bike, playing dodgeball and flying Frisbees with my friends, and shooting my Daisy BB rifle.
     
    OWM, TimBob, Harhib and 1 other person like this.
  4. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

    12,357
    1,618
    113
    Only if their parents are completely retarded.
     
    mountainman444, OWM and TimBob like this.
  5. OWM

    OWM Well-Known Member

    3,051
    790
    113
    Just late yesterday afternoon I watched out the window as my Grandson set in the grass surrounded by a three young wild cottontail rabbits as they fed on the grass around him. He does it every day and has named his favorite Harvey. Most kids, well a lot more than most play outside and find the experience both rewarding and fulfilling. Then I see some utter bull crap like the article above. Those kids are not at fault but their biologicals are disgusting creatures. Notice I did not call them parents.
     
    Savannah Dan likes this.
  6. Savannah Dan

    Savannah Dan Cross-drawer

    6,920
    247
    63
    I don't know how many hours I spent watching antlions catching their lunch.
     
  7. Clark

    Clark Active Member

    985
    80
    28
    Better headline: "Parents mentally abuse kids by telling them the outdoors is gonna die and it's our fault"
     
    TimBob, Harhib, mrhutch and 1 other person like this.
  8. OWM

    OWM Well-Known Member

    3,051
    790
    113
    How many times did you get a small stick and use it to go round and round very slowly and carefully in the hole to make the antlion come up for a visit.
     
  9. FrontSight

    FrontSight Well-Known Member

    1,193
    82
    48
    When I was about 5 or so, my Great Aunt would capture a Cicada and tie a 6 ft length of sewing thread to it's leg and I would hold it while it flew in circles.
     
  10. Phil1979

    Phil1979 Member Georgia Carry

    11,448
    581
    113
    I did that once with a yellow jacket after mildly stunning it. When it recovered it flew right to me and I ran. Fortunately, the weight of the thread on its leg made me faster.

     
  11. Savannah Dan

    Savannah Dan Cross-drawer

    6,920
    247
    63
    Every now and again I would employ a piece of pine straw to get a grain of sand or 2 to roll down the side of their little pit prompting them to start kicking more sand up to knock down whatever was there. I was more likely to catch fire ants and drop the little red devils into the ant lion den of doom. It was very rewarding and entertaining.
     
  12. OWM

    OWM Well-Known Member

    3,051
    790
    113
    I'm proud to call you a neighbor as it were and fellow Georgian.
     
    Harhib and Savannah Dan like this.
  13. FrontSight

    FrontSight Well-Known Member

    1,193
    82
    48
    Who among you have watched a Tumbleturd plying its trade?
     
  14. OWM

    OWM Well-Known Member

    3,051
    790
    113
    Who among us have supplied them with the necessary logistics?
     
  15. FrontSight

    FrontSight Well-Known Member

    1,193
    82
    48
    Not I, but I would watch them rolling their bounty behind the mule barn.
     
  16. Harhib

    Harhib Active Member

    351
    42
    28
    I used to do the same thing with Junebugs
     
  17. dhaller

    dhaller Active Member

    246
    58
    28
    Well if you actually read the article, it says kids need to spend time out of doors to learn to connect to the natural world, otherwise it will scare them.

    I'm often horrified by the degree to which parents fail to let their kids play outside (ironically, I see kids glued to digital media and TVs much more in the suburbs than intown... I guess when it's in your backyard, you take it for granted?). I remember taking my daughter hiking at Sweetwater Creek once when she was three, a daddy/daughter outing, and there was a couple there with a young boy about maybe 10... soft and fat, the boy was having a spectacular meltdown, screaming that he wanted to go home and play his video games. It's probably the single most disgusted I've ever been with a child... though, of course, this is really simply failure on the part of the parents.

    That said, it is pretty sad that we (the USA) no longer support kids just wandering and exploring. I have a second home in Japan, and there my daughter (now eight) can get that experience of wandering around the neighborhood with her friends, exploring parks, going to a convenience store to get candy or pop, going to the movies, and basically having the kind of experience I had... and then we come back to the states and it's car seats and supervised playdates again. Alas.

    I'm a big fan of "free range kids", but it only works when its a whole neighborhood like that. In Atlanta, probably Candler Park is the one neighborhood where I feel like I've traveled back to The Seventies, with kids biking on the streets, going in a little group to the park, hanging out at Candler Park Market having a King of Pops, etc.

    A book I recommend to all parents in Richard Louv's "Last Child in the Woods", which offers a practicum for raising nature-loving kids. He points out, and I agree, that one of the giant failures of the contemporary "eco" movement is this idea of *leaving nature alone*: how can you learn about it if you don't interact with it?

    A great example is the rule at State Parks making it unlawful to remove material from the parks: what kid doesn't want to take a cool rock home? It's a mistake, forbidding "interaction".

    I think of my relationship with nature as a kid: scouting, camping, hunting, rock collecting, fossil hunting (involving busting rocks to find fossils), building forts, digging trenches and holes, building dams on creeks (got in trouble for that one a few times), and just generally ignoring private property as friends and I crossed fields, climbed hay bales, whatever. Actual, material interaction with nature.

    (I've been looking at buying a house in Iceland, and in looking at real estate I've come across an interesting legal tradition called "the everyman's right" or "freedom to roam", which basically says people have the right to use private property: for example, traversing the land on foot, and maybe camping somewhere at night, and a right to "reasonable use" of private lands, such as foraging berries. It comes from Norse hospitality traditions. When I think back on my own "free range" childhood, kids basically had "freedom to roam"... it never even occurred to us that we were, say, playing in someone's front yard, or back yard, or woods. No child ever - EVER - comes on my lawn; it just doesn't happen anymore. One of the many things modern America has lost is basic, shared community, and kids suffer from that most of all.)

    DH
     
  18. OWM

    OWM Well-Known Member

    3,051
    790
    113
    And that Sir is relative to where you live. It is still very much in existence though not as widespread as it once was.
     
  19. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

    12,357
    1,618
    113
    Maybe it would stop if the damn "Karens" and "Chads" would mind their own business and stop calling the cops on "unattended" kids and then go arrest the parents for child neglect or child endangerment or some other bullshit charges. "Kneecapping" comes to mind.
     
  20. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

    12,357
    1,618
    113
    That's not something you hear very often. If you don't mind my asking, was that the result of business or something you thought would be interesting for whatever reasons?