Coyote hunting

Discussion in 'Off-topic' started by Aberk, Jan 31, 2011.

  1. Aberk

    Aberk Custom User Title

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    Is there a law that says what min or max caliber can be used on coyote? I'm not having much luck with my LexisNexis search.
     
  2. mygunstoo

    mygunstoo Active Member

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    Please dont kill them. Coyotes eat stray cats. :eek:
     

  3. TippinTaco

    TippinTaco New Member

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    they also attack people :D
     
  4. lostprofit

    lostprofit New Member

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    So do mosquitoes. :shock:
     
  5. EJR914

    EJR914 Cheezburger Operator

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    I'm really not sure about that. Furthermore, I don't think Georgia is really in the business of telling you that you cannot hunt with a certain caliber. Therefore, if it is a caliber that is legal to own, I would guess you can use it for hunting.

    I mean, who's to say that you overkilled an animal. In fact, I think its more humane to use a caliber that you know will get the job done, instead of using a weaker one that will not kill the animal quickly.

    .308 will definitely take out a coyote, and you could use .223 or 5.56 as well.

    IANAL.
     
  6. hailcat

    hailcat Guest

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    anything you want at any time of day (must use a 6v light at night). there is no closed season and no limit.
     
  7. Aberk

    Aberk Custom User Title

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    I was told by a friend (who was told by DNR supposedly), that he must use a .22 magnum or smaller to shoot coyote.
     
  8. hailcat

    hailcat Guest

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    either that or a .17 hmr would be a great coyote gun.
     
  9. lostprofit

    lostprofit New Member

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    Huh? I'm sure it would get the job done as long as it's a head shot. But, I think any type of body shot would not be a humane kill. Now, I'm not a hunter and I don't necessarily condone coyote hunting. But, if your going to kill an animal, please do it in as humane a way as you can.
     
  10. EJR914

    EJR914 Cheezburger Operator

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    Or smaller? Hmm, maybe that is if you are hunting on DNR land or something. I don't know. I'll try to go look it up.

    Furthermore, I would think that if may be .22 magnum or larger. I'm going to be honest with you. You'd have to be a very good shoot to take down a coyote with a 17 HMR. I wouldn't do it. I'd say you'd have to take a headshot, or definitely make sure you perfectly hit heart/lung. If you missed only slightly, I'm not sure it would kill the coyote quickly.

    When I shoot something, I want it to die quickly and not run off and go die somewhere else, or just run away and live wounded for the rest of its life.

    I've always heard of people using .223 to take down coyotes. I don't think they would have done so illegally.
     
  11. SAXD2003

    SAXD2003 New Member

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    I really need to go shoot some coyotes on our property. Probably will use the .223 when I get around to popping one. Coyotes are horrible for baby deer, turkeys, and the seemingly almost extinct Bobwhite Quail. Predator control is a must.
     
  12. hailcat

    hailcat Guest

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    you could really use that argument with just about any caliber round and any animal. know your limits and know the limits of your weapon, and most of all, apply common sense. don't take a dumb shot "just to see if i can do it". i guarantee you could take down a coyote with a .17 hmr at 100 yards if you hit him in the vitals. hornady vmax leaves a nasty wound that i doubt any human could survive if hit in the vitals.

    bottom line, use whatever you want to hunt coyotes. just be smart about it.
     
  13. 1clearshot

    1clearshot Member

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    Best I gathered from 2010-2011 Georgia Hunting seasons & regulations booklet, in private land for unprotected species only - any firearm.

    If you are hunting in WMA, each one has some of their own regulations. Like no night hunt or use caliber that is allowed for whatever other hunt that is going on.... but electronic calls are now allowed.
     
  14. KingTiger

    KingTiger Member

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    IANAL.[/quote]

    I was told by a friend (who was told by DNR supposedly), that he must use a .22 magnum or smaller to shoot coyote.[/quote]

    Fox & bobcats can only be harvested with rimfires.

    Use any thing you want on coyotes.
     
  15. SaltySamurai

    SaltySamurai New Member

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    GON always has the up-to-date hunting policies for GA......but last I'd checked (2009-2010), the ONLY restrictions for coyote hunting were on WMA's......you had to abide by the seasonal restrictions for WMA (BP, bow season before rifles).

    If you aren't hunting WMA's.......open season, no firearm restrictions, electronic calls ok, and hunting at night w or w/o lights is ok.

    I didn't make time to go last year, but in 2009 I dropped a yote with a 50-grain .223 JHP.

    Play the wind, hunt at dawn, and practice your calling. It's NOTHING like the Nebraska prairie hunts you see on tv. GA coyotes have woods they can hide in. You won't see them till they come out of a tree or brush line. It's TOUGH to get a shot. But it's worth it when you do.

    The rush of a monster shooter deer wandering into your sight is one thing.......the rush of actually calling in a predator is a whole'nother experience.

    Here's my old pic:
    [​IMG]
     
  16. jlcnuke

    jlcnuke New Member

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    Small game is .22 magnum or smaller and it's easy to interpret that coyote is included in small game when reading some of their materials. However, the specific list of small game does not include coyotes.
     
  17. Match10

    Match10 Active Member

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    A coyote is not small game, it's a varmit or predator.

    The only good thing about a coyote is a fur lining for ajacket hood. I've killed thousands with everything from 22 magnum to 7 mm RemMag.
     
  18. daily packer

    daily packer New Member

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    Been hunting them for years and do predator control when i have time. A .17 HMR will drop a yote dead in his tracks, with good shot placement , with no problem at all! But .223 and .243 are ideal. You can use electronic calls and up to a 6volt light. There is no season or limits. WMAs require you use whatever caliber is allowed for the current hunting season but no restrictions off season. Some do not allow night hunting.
    I personally like mouth calls, but have electronic and decoys as well. My best luck has been with a mouth rabbit call while very well hidden. Yotes know every inch of there territory and every smell. The are very intelligent and will almost always try to move downwind of the noise they come to. Be very still and use a decoy about 50 yards from you if possible to draw their attention.
    Good Luck and welcome to the addiction!!! :righton:
     
  19. MyFred

    MyFred Banned

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    That's why I also shoot mosquitoes!!!
     
  20. SongDogSniper

    SongDogSniper New Member

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    Well, I have been hunting them for years in Georgia, both WMA and private land, with a good deal of success. They are not considered game, and are not regulated as such. On private land, shoot them with whatever you want basically, whenever you want, as long as it is your or your family's land, or you have the landowner's written permission to be there hunting at that time. Centerfire rifles, shotguns with #1, #2 or #4 buck, etc, it is all good on private land.

    I have taken many with the .223 Remington. Especially in the eastern states. But when I travel out west to join friends on open plains coyote hunts, there I find my .22-250 does a much better job. Over the years I have found that if I were to settle on just one yote rifle caliber, it would be the .243 Winchester. I have a short bolt action that I camoed for this purpose, and it is a real winner! A semi-auto rifle is a big help if you plan to invest in a quality electronic caller (or really work on your mouth calls!) and start to bring in doubles. Especially good after the pups start roaming, where you can easily have the parent yotes come in after Junior, be ready for it!

    On public lands (i.e. WMAs) you must use whatever weapons are allowed for the game that is in season. So, for example, during small game season on WMAs, you may use rimfire rifles and pistols, plugged shotguns with shot size up to #2 birdshot, or muzzleloaders. NO buckshot (not even small size buckshot) and NO centerfire rifles or pistols may be used or possessed afield for hunting-related activities during small game season. During big game seasons (i.e. deer, bear, etc) you may use centerfire rifles, pistols, or muzzleloaders. You get the picture? Whatever game is in season on the WMA, you must use those weapons and only those weapons even if you are hunting coyote and not the particular game that is in season. DNR can and does check, (yes, I have been stopped and checked many times!) and don't even try the "but I was only hunting coyote not deer" excuse if you are caught with a .223 in the field during small game season.

    On public lands, I tend to use a .22 magnum rifle, 12 gauge pump with xtra tight .060 choke, rifle sights, and magnum #2 lead shotshells, or a .50 cal 200 grain muzzleloader, depending on my mood and whether or not I am hunting with someone else (and what they plan to use). Often times, if they are using a rifle, I will use the shotgun and take them close in (out to 40 yards max) and on the move. Or vice versa. Or I will go for the longer shots using the muzzleloader, despite the one shot handicap (this is where it is nice to have a buddy with a pump shotgun or some sort of repeating rifle)

    I use both an electronic caller as well as mouth calls. Often times, I use the electronic caller to bring 'em in, then once they get within sight or earshot, I will try to bring them into killing range with the mouth call or a squeaker.

    It's a blast, and also one of the hardest critters I've tried to hunt. Extremely smart, they will learn from each and every one of your mistakes. Best damn nose and ears in the forest if you ask me. Pay very close attention to the wind and your elevation as it pertains to their anticipated path of approach. Keep in mind they will try to come at you from downwind, like I said they are SMART, especially the older males.

    Ok, that's enough, I'm not trying to write a novel here. Good luck.