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Member Georgia Carry
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bought some cheap $4.97lb chuck roast and decided to prepare it like steak.

1. Marinade (soy sauce, rice wine vinegar, red wine, sea salt, black pepper, garlic powder, french fry seasoning, Tajin Clasico Seasoning).

Poked a few holes in each of the three pieces of meat before putting in marinade bag, and then sealed it up and massaged it. Threw it in the frig for 24 hours.

2. Cast iron pan with olive oil and real butter. Medium-high heat. Seared each side for 5 minutes. Then seared the edges a little.

3. Put a whole diced Vidalia onion around the meat in the pan.

4. Put a sheet of foil over the pan, and put in 300 degree pre-heated oven.

5. Take it out after 2 hours.

6. Enjoy

7. Yum!

Will post pics later, maybe tomorrow.
 

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Atlanta Overwatch
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Sounds good!

I had a NY Strip tonight that was cooked in cast iron with butter, a little salt, a pepper crust, and a splash of red wine.

The veggies were sautéed in the steak juices with salt, pepper, butter, and red wine.

A few fingers of 12yr Macallan Double Cask washed it all down.

Food Tableware Ingredient Recipe Plate
 

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London broil is a great cheap steak. Just cook it rare and it's plenty edible, and very lean. I like to cut a big one into 6-8 oz portions and freeze them individually, then i have an easy steak dinner whenever I feel like it. Not as good as a fat ribeye, but it beats a cheap restaurant special.
 

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Member Georgia Carry
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Okay, I took it out after 1.5 hours, which is a good thing. It was still a little too well done for me, but tender and good, even if a bit on the dry side. I ate it all except for one small piece of gristle, and ate most of the onion, which was excellent in it own right.

Next time, I'll reduce the sear time to only four minutes per side, and reduce the oven temp to 250.

But this was my first time doing this, so not bad for a first effort.
 

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Member Georgia Carry
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yep, you bested me on that one, on the steak and the drink! Now that I have a little experience under my belt, I'm gonna go with a better cut of meat.

After eating 24oz of chuck, just thinking about it makes me hungry again. :lol:

Sounds good!

I had a NY Strip tonight that was cooked in cast iron with butter, a little salt, a pepper crust, and a splash of red wine.

The veggies were sautéed in the steak juices with salt, pepper, butter, and red wine.

A few fingers of 12yr Macallan Double Cask washed it all down.

View attachment 8450
 

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Atlanta Overwatch
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I have to admit, I do cheat a little. I use a meat thermometer with an alarm setting. I cook into it reaches 70 degrees internal temp, turn it over, then cook until 135, and let it test.
 

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Member Georgia Carry
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
CM, are we talking about an actual physical confrontation with an iron skillet?

I know that would hurt. I do have experience getting hit in the head. Had a ladder fall on me once when I was a kid.

Sheesh, more Skillets again... I haven't recovered from the last set.
 

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Man of Myth and Legend
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Are you folks just discovering cast iron? My wife has about 15 cooking implements made of that. None made after Pearl Harbor. Her 2 favorite she received from her great granny. We have traced those 2 to within about 5 years of 1900. She is the worlds best cook. And those are the worlds best cooking implements.

If your stuff is newer do some research and hit the yard sales and flea markets. There is a true difference in the material and cooking results between the pre-WWII and post.


Nemo
 

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:) :) :)
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Marinade over night.

Heat skillet up to hot.

Throw meat on burning hot skillet. Give each side 2 minutes.

Done. Eat.
 

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I watch the watchers
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  • 3 pound boneless beef chuck roast, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1 cup beef broth (withhold 1/4 cup for use with cornstarch)
  • 1/2 cup reduced sodium soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoons freshly grated ginger
  • 1 teaspoon Sriracha, or more, to taste (I personally prefer a dollop of Gochujang, but it's harder to find.
  • 1/2 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon white pepper

    (withheld)
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon sesame seeds
  • 2 green onions, thinly sliced
Throw everything except the cornstarch in a crock pot and cook on low heat for 7-8 hours or high heat for 3-4 hours. Mix broth and cornstarch add for the last 30 minutes on high.

Serve garnished with green onion and sesame seeds on a bed of white rice atop a red leaf lettuce ... err.. leaf. Wrap up a bite sized bit and enjoy.

I'm a big fan of settin' an' forgettin' (But if you want it quick, just grill strips of meat instead of cubes for about 30 seconds each and enjoy)
 

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Token Liberal Hippie
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Are you folks just discovering cast iron? My wife has about 15 cooking implements made of that. None made after Pearl Harbor. Her 2 favorite she received from her great granny. We have traced those 2 to within about 5 years of 1900. She is the worlds best cook. And those are the worlds best cooking implements.

If your stuff is newer do some research and hit the yard sales and flea markets. There is a true difference in the material and cooking results between the pre-WWII and post.

Nemo
I inherited a bunch of pieces from various grandmothers, great grandmothers, and other family. They're my favorite skillets. Those and my Le Creuset Dutch oven I got from grandma make up about 99% of my non-crockpot cooking.
 

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Member Georgia Carry
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I think the one we have is from my granny. Might have two, if I can find the other one - otherwise my mom still has that one.

Had it (them) a long time, but I'm a slow learner. My bride takes pity and lets me play in the kitchen once in a while. ;-)

My grandma was the world's best cook, and now my bride and mom are tied for first place.

Are you folks just discovering cast iron? My wife has about 15 cooking implements made of that. None made after Pearl Harbor. Her 2 favorite she received from her great granny. We have traced those 2 to within about 5 years of 1900. She is the worlds best cook. And those are the worlds best cooking implements.

If your stuff is newer do some research and hit the yard sales and flea markets. There is a true difference in the material and cooking results between the pre-WWII and post.

Nemo
 

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Marinade over night.

Heat skillet up to hot.

Throw meat on burning hot skillet. Give each side 2 minutes.

Done. Eat.
No marinade needed.

Rub the steak down with olive oil, then fresh cracked pepper and a heavy amount of kosher salt on both sides. Heat the skillet on high, then add a tablespoon or two of olive oil. Sear the steak on both sides, long enough for it to release from the pan without effort (if you try to flip it too soon, that beautiful crust will stick to the pan instead of the steak). Turn down the heat to low, add 3 tablespoons of real butter, a whole peeled garlic clove, and fresh or dried thyme and rosemary. Flip the steak occasionally, spooning the butter over the meat regularly. Cook to rare and let it rest for 10 minutes after you take it off the heat.

Works well for any cut and you will never marinade or grill a steak again.
 

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Man of Myth and Legend
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15,172 Posts
Marinade over night.

Heat skillet up to hot.

Throw meat on burning hot skillet. Give each side 2 minutes.

Done. Eat.
Do you cook your soylent green or is that good raw?

Nemo
 

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No marinade needed.

Rub the steak down with olive oil, then fresh cracked pepper and a heavy amount of kosher salt on both sides. Heat the skillet on high, then add a tablespoon or two of olive oil. Sear the steak on both sides, long enough for it to release from the pan without effort (if you try to flip it too soon, that beautiful crust will stick to the pan instead of the steak). Turn down the heat to low, add 3 tablespoons of real butter, a whole peeled garlic clove, and fresh or dried thyme and rosemary. Flip the steak occasionally, spooning the butter over the meat regularly. Cook to rare and let it rest for 10 minutes after you take it off the heat.

Works well for any cut and you will never marinade or grill a steak again.
I have cooked steaks like that and they are good, but the house gets smoked up pretty bad.
 

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I have cooked steaks like that and they are good, but the house gets smoked up pretty bad.
It's not as bad if you wait to add oil to the pan until the pan has finished pre-heating.

You can also use the pan over the grill burner outside if you really wanted too. Still better than cooking the steak directly on the grill, unless you have a wood grill and some good hickory to cook it over.
 
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