Constitution Day

Discussion in 'Off-topic' started by DonT, Sep 17, 2017.

  1. DonT

    DonT Deplorable bitter clinger.

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    Last edited: Sep 17, 2017
  2. StarJack

    StarJack Well Aged Member

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    Thanks for the link DonT.
     

  3. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    This is just wrong. It was almost a year after that (10 months) before the required number of states ratified it. No state ratified it for almost three months.

    September 17 was the date the convention approved a final proposed constitution to be sent to the states and held a signing ceremony.

    Remember, on September 17 there was not even a bill of rights. That is, no First Amendment. No Second Amendment.

    The antifederalists were up in arms about it and caused a lot of problems in state legislatures, especially Massachusetts (where the revolution was born, shots were fired, and a militia siege of Boston commenced a year before Congress declared independence and was still seeking to make peace with the king). Oh, how the people of Massachusetts have fallen over the centuries.

    The antifederalists finally convinced James Madison that a bill of rights was needed. His concession tipped New York and Virginia into signing on. Remember, a state not ratifying would not have joined, so the new country would be geographically split into three distinct locations if these two states did not join.

    Even after ratification there was no bill of rights. The federalists pledged to the antifederalists that this would be the first order of business for the new Congress, and so the states all ratified.

    September 1789 Congress House and Senate accept a conference committee report. Yes, the bill of rights was the work of the janitors in conference committee! Did you all think that the Georgia General Assembly created this procedure? LOL! :rotfl:

    Anyway, 12 amendments were added from James Madison's originally proposed 19, but the states ratified only ten of them. The remaining two were rejected, but in 1982 a university student went to work on getting one of them ratified, and it eventually in 1992, became the 27th Amendment.

    The one that was rejected would be a good one, though, as I believe it would keep power in one chamber (the House) closer to the people, but, well, they rejected it.
     
  4. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    The rejected First Amendment (the fourth and fifth became the first amendment):

    First. That there be prefixed to the Constitution a declaration, that all power is originally vested in, and consequently derived from, the people.

    That Government is instituted and ought to be exercised for the benefit of the people; which consists in the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the right of acquiring and using property, and generally of pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.

    That the people have an indubitable, unalienable, and indefeasible right to reform or change their Government, whenever it be found adverse or inadequate to the purposes of its institution.

    Secondly. That in article 1st, section 2, clause 3, these words be struck out, to wit: "The number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty thousand, but each State shall have at least one Representative, and until such enumeration shall be made;" and that in place thereof be inserted these words, to wit: "After the first actual enumeration, there shall be one Representative for every thirty thousand, until the number amounts to ——, after which the proportion shall be so regulated by Congress, that the number shall never be less than ——, nor more than ——, but each State shall, after the first enumeration, have at least two Representatives; and prior thereto."​

    Well, what do you think?
     
  5. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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  6. DonT

    DonT Deplorable bitter clinger.

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    Thanks for the clarification.
     
  7. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Georgia would have over 300 representatives sent to Congress. My county, Coweta, would have 4 Representatives, based on its population. It would probably be pretty easy to get your Representative on the telephone if he represented only 30,000 of you.
     
  8. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    No problem. I hate the way history is taught in schools, especially regarding the revolution and our constitution.

    Damn near close to 100% of persons in the US do not realize the revolution had been going on for a year before the Declaration of independence, or that the Constitution did not come about for a dozen more years, sixteen if you wait for the 1792 ratification of the bill of rights (technically 1791 for ratification, but by 1792 all 14 - yes, 14* - had ratified it), the date the Second Amendment became enshrined in the Constitution.

    That period of time, and the experience of the Americans in throwing off their government, illustrates why so many thought the Second Amendment was so important that they were not willing to subject themselves to a new government without it being enshrined in the founding charter. Ah, that's probably the same reason the schools do not teach much about this.





    *Read a biography of Ethan Allen some day if you want an interesting history lesson about this period and the 14th state, which was almost entirely his creation and a result of his guerrilla warfare, civil war with New York, and terrorist tactics.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2017
  9. 45_Fan

    45_Fan Well-Known Member

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    Our current US reps "speak" for more than 25 times that number!
    Currently our local state reps speak for almost 50,000 people.