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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Imagine a gun like the Taurus Judge, but with the cylinder a little longer.
Maybe 4" length on the cylinder, and a 1.75" barrel in front of that.

The standard caliber would be .45 Colt/ .410 shotshells.

But you could stick sleeves/ liners into those five big chambers and then use the revolver with .38 / .357.
Or 9mm.
Or, for training newbies who are noise sensitive and recoil-shy, .32 (either ACP or S&W long).

For any of the sub-caliber rounds, they would not ever touch the gun's own barrel.
The barrel would be like a "bloop tube" on a target rifle. Or one of those 6" long flash hiders on an AR. The bullet passes through it without touching it.

However, the rifling would be in the sleeve/tube itself. The insert would be both a chamber adapter AND a short rifled barrel section.

You could also have a .38/ .357 SHOTSHELL-ONLY insert that is smoothbore, to use CCI's blue-capsule shotshells for pest control and practicing on moving targets thrown into the air.

Even if the "barrel" on the gun itself would not do any good other than increase sight radius for the .357 or smaller-diameter calibers, there would be 2.5" of "bore" in each chamber insert to boost the velocity and stabilize the bullet for accuracy. At least enough accuracy to train newbies how to hit a man-sized target center of mass, or knock over old Coke cans at 7 yards.
 

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However, the rifling would be in the sleeve/tube itself. The insert would be both a chamber adapter AND a short rifled barrel section.
Interesting concept for sure, but it would be a challenge to engineer. Forcing that slug through the barrel is going to introduce a significant torque on the sleeve. You would need a keyed/threaded sleeve of so sort, which would reduce the reinforcement on the larger caliber, increasing the risk of bulge/rupture. You would almost need one sleeve for each caliber.

Before going to that length, I think I would make the barrel threaded like a rifle and just use smooth sleeves in the cylinder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

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Interesting concept for sure, but it would be a challenge to engineer. Forcing that slug through the barrel is going to introduce a significant torque on the sleeve. You would need a keyed/threaded sleeve of so sort, which would reduce the reinforcement on the larger caliber, increasing the risk of bulge/rupture. You would almost need one sleeve for each caliber.

Before going to that length, I think I would make the barrel threaded like a rifle and just use smooth sleeves in the cylinder.
Maybe have a thin groove in the cylinder connecting each chamber and the adapter be one piece and lock in the groove. Kind of like a toy cap gun.

Or inlet it deeper and require an adapter to chamber any round. Basically make it a two piece cylinder. You could machine the whole cylinder down a 1/4" or so except for the center. It could also be keyed too, because you wouldn't be able to fire it without an insert.
 

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Imagine a gun like the Taurus Judge, but with the cylinder a little longer.
Maybe 4" length on the cylinder, and a 1.75" barrel in front of that.

The standard caliber would be .45 Colt/ .410 shotshells.

But you could stick sleeves/ liners into those five big chambers and then use the revolver with .38 / .357.
Or 9mm.
Or, for training newbies who are noise sensitive and recoil-shy, .32 (either ACP or S&W long).

For any of the sub-caliber rounds, they would not ever touch the gun's own barrel.
The barrel would be like a "bloop tube" on a target rifle. Or one of those 6" long flash hiders on an AR. The bullet passes through it without touching it.

However, the rifling would be in the sleeve/tube itself. The insert would be both a chamber adapter AND a short rifled barrel section.

You could also have a .38/ .357 SHOTSHELL-ONLY insert that is smoothbore, to use CCI's blue-capsule shotshells for pest control and practicing on moving targets thrown into the air.

Even if the "barrel" on the gun itself would not do any good other than increase sight radius for the .357 or smaller-diameter calibers, there would be 2.5" of "bore" in each chamber insert to boost the velocity and stabilize the bullet for accuracy. At least enough accuracy to train newbies how to hit a man-sized target center of mass, or knock over old Coke cans at 7 yards.
how about going to 45acp on moon clips,load the adapter as a unit
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You guys have some good ideas.

Now I'm really seeing the benefit of an outer cylinder that is never used alone, but which must always have one of several inner sleeve sets clipped into it.
Buyers could choose to get these inner cylinder sets in pretty much any centerfire caliber, or even rimfire (although the holes would have to be offset to put the rim of the cartridge in the center of the cylinder. That means the bullet would pass much closer to one side of the bore than the other as it zips out the oversized barrel.

If that's how it worked, there's probably no reason to even have rifling in the barrel itself. It could just be a hollow bloop tube / flash hider / barrel extension.
The 4" cylinder with its 4" inner sleeve set would be the real bore both for containing the pressure and inducing spin on the bullet.
 

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Forget introducing rimfire to the options. Stick with centerfire.

Snubnose that handgun. If the barrel does nothing but add sight radius, then drop the barrel length to make it more concealable/carry-able.... or delete the barrel entirely. The end of the cylinder is the muzzle. Pepperbox style looking revolver.
 
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