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Lawyer and Gun Activist
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
cold guns, warm house:

When you take your guns from a warm house out into the cold air and put then in your cold vehicle, it's not a problem.

BUT, later when you return home, and you bring that cold gun into your warm and humid house, it's likely to get condensation on the exposed metal surfaces.

Just like a cold beverage can, taken out of the fridge, will "sweat" beads of water. The cold metal surface is lower than the dew point of the moist air surrounding it, and thus the moisture is leaving the air and collecting on the can.

It can collect on your gun, too.

So what do you folks do about it??

I've tried two things:

1.) Bring the guns in well-wrapped in cases and gun rugs and inside closed range bags. Then I set them down in a dry part of the house-- not near the kitchen, laundry room, or bathroom. I let them warm up gradually, and not exposed to the air.

2.) OR, I just bring them in any way I want, and immediately heat them up with a hair dryer, or by setting them on some wooden blocks in front of a space heater.

What do y'all do about bringing ice-cold guns into a warm house?
 

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Lawyer and Gun Activist
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Okay, but let's ASSUME that you didn't warm up the guns in your vehicle before you arrived home.
Let's say the guns are in the trunk of a sedan. Or in the covered (but unheated) bed of a pickup truck.
Or you got home at midnight and were too tired to unload the car, so you left your guns out there overnight.
In the morning, it's 28 degrees and your vehicle is frosted-over. You want to bring the guns in and clean them after breakfast.
Now what will you do?
 

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NRA Instructor
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3,391 Posts
I have never had an issue with moister condensing on a firearm. I can see why it could happen but a quick wipe down with a gun cloth treated with break free or similar product would take care of the external and a oiled patch through the bore followed by a dry patch would take care of the bore. The other moving parts in the action would (should) have enough oil to displace any moister that could form on them. If not a couple of drops of oil or quick spray with WD40. All in all you're talking 5 to 10 minutes to take care of an issue that is very rare if it were to happen.
 

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Bring them in and clean them...

...problem solved.
:rotfl::rotfl::rotfl:

Really, gs, I think you're way overthinking this. When I lived in NH and OH I'd go shoot outdoors in the winter and never had any issues. Had cold guns but never any frosted over guns. Bring 'em in, oily rags, put 'em away.
 

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I watch the watchers
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The condensations disappears quickly; as soon as the guns reach room temperature. I suppose it might be worrisome if your firearm has a delicate finish like bluing and has had the oil evaporate. But that smacks of someone that doesn't take care of his tools in the first place.

If I were truly worried about it, I'd just give a prophylactic spritz with Eezox before going out; I've found it to be The most corrosion preventative available at reasonable cost.
 

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Oil. Then keep them from looking all dusty and grimy...that holds water and encourages corrosion.

There is also a huge difference in the amount of humidity, and thus condensation that can form, in my house in the winter vs summer. When I pull my .38 out of the lock box in the car at 20F and bring it in the house at 68F in the winter time, it remains cold for several hours without condensation. However, when I take that same .38 out of the house at 78F to the garage and set it on the workbench in the summertime, it will sweat in 85%+ humidity and 95F+ weather.
 

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Carry a Glock, because then you just won't care. Also, they make good hammers too.
+1 and I ride a motorcycle there is no heater.
 

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NRA Instructor
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+1 and I ride a motorcycle there is no heater.
I've carried guns on a Harley with ice and snow on the ground. Never noticed there being an issue. Can it happen? I suppose it can but it's not the same thing as a glass of ice tea outside on a warm humid day. Most of the heat in the house is dry because of it being heated. So it's less likely to condense on a cold object that outside air. Even if it does then the solution is posted above.
 

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Man of Myth and Legend
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Carry a Glock, because then you just won't care. Also, they make good hammers too.
Carry a stainless steel S&W. Then you have real gun that won't rust instead of plastic fantastic junk.

Nemo
 

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Carry a stainless steel S&W. Then you have real gun that won't rust instead of plastic fantastic junk.

Nemo
This. My FNX is all plastic and stainless steel. I've never had any problems out in the rain, in the snow, at -25, sweating on it, or even taking an accidental swim.

Az
 

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Okay, but let's ASSUME that you didn't warm up the guns in your vehicle before you arrived home.
Let's say the guns are in the trunk of a sedan. Or in the covered (but unheated) bed of a pickup truck.
Or you got home at midnight and were too tired to unload the car, so you left your guns out there overnight.
In the morning, it's 28 degrees and your vehicle is frosted-over. You want to bring the guns in and clean them after breakfast.
Now what will you do?
These days, if you leave firearms or anything else of value in a vehicle overnight I think it's unreasonable to think it will still be there in the morning. Even in the better neighborhoods.
 
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