Cobb County Recruits

Discussion in 'Off-topic' started by pro2am, Aug 8, 2006.

  1. pro2am

    pro2am New Member

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    Class of police recruits is fired
    Cobb group caught in cheating scandal

    By JENNIFER BRETT
    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

    Published on: 08/08/06

    An entire class of Cobb County police recruits was fired Monday after they cheated on a test, authorities said.

    "Not much shocks me after 35 years in this business, but I was shocked," said Mickey Lloyd, Cobb's public safety director.

    A police academy instructor caught two recruits comparing answers during a written exam last week, Lloyd said. After the academy alerted Lloyd on Friday, he ordered an inquest and soon learned that all 20 recruits had cheated, he said.

    Most of the recruits admitted to cheating when asked about it, Lloyd said.

    "They'd gotten together and decided none of them was going to fail," said Lloyd.

    It's not clear how the recruits cheated, though Lloyd said they did not steal the test.

    The news "dismayed" Cobb County Commissioner Helen Goreham, but she praised the swift response in drumming out the recruits suspected of cheating.

    "Integrity with our police officers is something we do not skimp on," said Goreham, the commissioners' public safety liaison. "The level of service our officers provide the citizenry is top-notch. We will not tolerate an incident of this type."

    Investigators do not plan to file criminal charges against any class members — a mix of men and women of various backgrounds — but they might not ever wear a law enforcement badge in Georgia, Lloyd said.

    Authorities did not release the recruits' names.

    Cobb officials plan to report the dismissals to the Georgia Peace Officer Standards and Training Council, which oversees the training and certification of law enforcement officers.

    To get into the class, recruits had to have at least a high school diploma and pass a background check as well as psychiatric and polygraph tests — measures intended to weed out certain would-be cops.

    "You'd think you'd have the cream of the crop," Lloyd said.

    The recruits were county employees training to become sworn police officers. They were in the fifth week of a 22-week training period required to join about 600 officers on Cobb's police force, where salaries start around $34,600.

    Instructors stress the importance of honesty with recruits. Police officers are often key witnesses in criminal trials.

    "If you cheat, steal or lie, you lose your credibility in court," Lloyd said.

    Commission Chairman Sam Olens said, "Our police officers need to be beyond reproach."

    Lloyd sounded weary and disappointed Monday but stressed his confidence in Cobb County's thin blue line.

    "The Cobb County Police Department is among the best in the state," he said. "There are a lot of fine officers out there. They work hard and they're honest. This had to be done in order to maintain this reputation."

    News of the incident was rippling through the police department and county administration Monday.

    "Everybody's very disturbed about it," said police spokesman Dana Pierce. "It's a disappointment to all of us."
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    And people wonder why some people don't trust LEO's...come on ...20 conspired to cheat on an exam. In my opinion, this incident doesn't just give the recruits a bad reputation, but it effects LEO's everywhere because more people will probably question their integrity.

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  2. Gunstar1

    Gunstar1 Administrator

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    I guess the polygraph test should have included a question about their willingness to cheat.
     

  3. ls1ssdavid

    ls1ssdavid New Member

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    This goes to show that Cops are just like everyone else. They are not special, they do not retain some special abilitys to be above the law. They are simply men and women hired to do a job and are humans also.

    I wonder if it was normal practice for recruits to cheat on the tests. Like one of those things never really talked about... but is done with the instructors looking the other way.
    Maybe it was just exact notes of questions on the test passed down from previous classes. And if that is so those police who took the same tests should be questioned in the investigation as well. Who knows how long it could have been normal practice to pass answers down. Hey i'm just throwing it out there.
     
  4. artz

    artz New Member

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    Thats messed up.... at least they get what they deserve...and never to be a cop again.
     
  5. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    The article in today's AJC states that they were sharing answers during the tests. An instructor walked in during the test and caught two of them, and subsequent questioning revealed that most of the class admitted to engaging in the same thing.
     
  6. ls1ssdavid

    ls1ssdavid New Member

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    I guess I quickly ran threw and that part didn't register.
     
  7. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Then again, you could be right.


    http://www.wsbtv.com/news/9656309/detail.html

    “There was one occasion where the officer came in and told us we had a certain amount of time to complete an exam, uh, he’s going to leave the room, we’re going to converse amongst ourselves and collectively come up with the answers to the test,†explains one former recruit.

    “There was an instance where we took a state mandated test, where we were told that one half of the class did questions 1 through 25 and the other half of the class did questions 26 through 50, and we cross filled in our answer sheets accordingly,†said another former police recruit.


    So, they allege that they were encouraged, if not told outright, by their superiors, to cheat on previous tests.


    :roll:
     
  8. ls1ssdavid

    ls1ssdavid New Member

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    So I hold the instructors just as accountable. Are they being investigated? They should be expecially after these new aligations.

    I knew something just didn't seem right when 20 students who want to become cops cheat. By pure numbers there would have been one recruit that would have stood up and not allowed the others to cheat.
     
  9. CrankE

    CrankE New Member

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    Well...? Let's hear it for TEAMWORK!!!! :? The good news is that they didn't graduate and get a badge. The bad news is that they'll have to find work somewhere else-maybe even at your business.
     
  10. geaux_tigers

    geaux_tigers Member

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    The recruits that cheated are responsible for cheating. The instructors are no more responsible by leaving the room than they would be if they stayed and the recruits cheated anyway. The instructors should be made accoutable for encouraging or not reporting cheating, should those accusations be deemed credible.

    When I was in college, it was not uncommon for instructors to leave the room during examinations, with the exception of some freshman level courses.
     
  11. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    It goes beyond simply leaving the room. The students were instructed to do what they did.
     
  12. Gunstar1

    Gunstar1 Administrator

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    Well from the story so far it must have been one instructor telling them to cheat and left the room for some reason. The students then cheat and while in discussion a different instructor came in and busted them.

    In that case it would be like a teacher telling you this was an open book test and walking out for a moment and the principal walking in and accusing all the students of cheating.

    It is as much or more on that instructor than the students. It is one thing to tell a class not to share answers and then the class does, it is quite another for the instructor to tell the class to share answers and then only expel the students for doing what the instructor told them was ok.