cleaning black powder

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by fmlaw1, Nov 1, 2010.

  1. fmlaw1

    fmlaw1 Active Member

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    I just bought a blank revolver to use during dog training. Typical starter pistol, cast pot metal. Black powder is very corrosive, so, how do I clean the pistol after using the black powder blanks?

    Will running a .22 BoreSnake through the cylinder with some Hoppes #9 do it? The barrel is partially obstructed down its length, so, an occsional .22 brush is the plan there.

    All suggestions are appreciated.
     
  2. groats

    groats New Member

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    Is it really black powder, or just blank ammo?
    If black powder, no, the bore snake won't be enough.
    Probably need to take the grips off and wash it thoroughly with hot water, scrubbing the barrel while doing so; then oil it well.
    There are black powder solvents for sale, but hot water is always nearby. And cheaper.
     

  3. 45_Fan

    45_Fan Well-Known Member

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    I agree with groats if it is black powder. It basically leaves a salt when it burns. Hot water is the way to go. Make sure to dry and oil quickly though.
     
  4. fmlaw1

    fmlaw1 Active Member

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    It is blank ammo, but it says black powder, hence my confusion. I believe that black powder is what it is, unless it is something they call BP. I would not know what that would be, I only own pistols.

    http://www.adventureoutdoors.us/superx- ... -1765.html
     
  5. Adam5

    Adam5 Atlanta Overwatch

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    When I had my BP cannon I used soap and very hot water for cleaning.
     
  6. Savvy Jack

    Savvy Jack Banned

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    After I shoot all my back powder firearms, including my daily carry, I rinse in hot water (cold water is fine but hot dries faster). After rinse/submerge, I use my air compressor to blow off excess water. I then clean inside of barrel with brass wire, again submerging in water (but just rinsing is fine), followed by cleaning patches cut out of cotton t-shirts. Once all is rinsed and clean I spray with Ballistol (water soluble) oil. Basically what happenes is when you shoot the firearm, the residue stays on top of the oil. You rinse the crud off the oil. After rinsing and cleaning, you can still feel the oil on the firearm. I still add more oil to cover any areas that the oil may have been removed from gun fire such as the inside of the barrel.

    True black powder can be left on a firearm for a few days without real worry. However, black powder substitute powders are EXTREAMLY corrosive when uncleaned in a humid climate.

    When I shoot many rounds in my rifles (Winchester 73", Marlin "Cowboy" and even an original 1887 lever action 12ga shotgun) I first rinse with the water hose followed by the aforementioned!!!!!!!!!!!

    All Black Powder Cartridge!
    [​IMG]
     
  7. SongDogSniper

    SongDogSniper New Member

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    Just as an FYI, Blackhorn 209 is a blackpowder substitute (for use only in modern 209 in-line ignition muzzleloaders) that is not highly corrosive and is cleaned using petroleum based cleaners (such as Hoppes). Makes cleaning your muzzleloader a lot easier.

    Amazing stuff, I use it exclusively in my TC Omega muzzleloader behind a 200gr .50 cal. Closest thing to shooting smokeless in a muzzleloader, short of a Savage 10ML-II.
     
  8. fflintlock

    fflintlock Active Member

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    If it is indeed "pot metal", I would not put any black powder in that pistol.
     
  9. groats

    groats New Member

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    According to that link, the "blank ammo" is also "incredibly accurate" and "high velocity"

    I'd like to know how they can tell.

    Anyway, if that's the ammo recommended for the pistol by the manufacturer, then that's what
    to use. Black powder is going to make a lot of smoke, maybe that's why it's used.
     
  10. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    black powder is easier to make blanks with. It's louder and doesn't require a heavy wad to partially block the barrel and raise chamber pressure.

    If this gun is made of cheap pot metal alloys, let me ask this: will it rust?
    Some cheap metals do not easily rust. Think of Matchbox cars that kids play with and leave out in the back yard for days at a time, getting morning dew on them, getting rained on. Getting dunked in the stream when the little "Evil Knievel" action figure fails to clear your backyard replica of Snake River Canyon.
     
  11. fmlaw1

    fmlaw1 Active Member

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    The metal certainly has that lead-gray color. It looks like some of the cap guns I had as a kid.

    I did not pay a lot for this pistol, but would like to keep it in service as long as possible. Though it will not last forever, like a $200 209 primer pistol or an H&R starter pistol might , I just like to keep my tools in their best working order.

    Sounds like I should be ok with a hot water rinse, blowing dry, then cleaning it with Hoppes #9, and a light coat of oil. I plan to make sure the powder is not left on it for very long.

    Thanks for the tips. I would not have thought to submerge a revolver in hot water!
     
  12. Savvy Jack

    Savvy Jack Banned

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    I totally missed the part about it not being a real firearm. My bad there!! I really do not know the proper way to clean the pot metal type starter pistols due to the alloy materials used.. Be advised that petroleum oils do not mix with water. Petroleum oils and black powder do not mix well either.