Carrying during Primitive Weapons Seasons

Discussion in 'GA Laws and Politics' started by got cope?, Oct 7, 2006.

  1. got cope?

    got cope? New Member

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    If one were to carry on one's own property while bowhunting for instance, would this still be deemed illegal? Since its on private property?

    How would one be caught on one's own private property? If a game warden were to just happen upon you on your property and catch you, what reason would he have to provide that he came onto the property in the first place? Does he need one?
    Kinda like they just cant walk into your house w/o probable cause? Sorry if I didnt get the terms technically correct.

    Also what if I decided to do some lunchtime plinking?

    Input apprecitated.

    Dicalaimer: I have no intentions of breaking any law Im just curious as to how such a scenario would play out.

    One change I would like more than any others I can think of would be our ability to carry at anytime while, or while not, hunting on any property including WMA's and state parks.
     
  2. GAGunOwner

    GAGunOwner Active Member

    I'm not sure...

    but I have heard that "game wardens" have the "right" to come on your property without permission. It's a rumor I've heard many times.




    Probably doing something obviously illegal or suspicious. Spotlighting, hunting with a modern weapon, etc.


    This is kinda the same argument you could use for carrying illegally to a public gathering. "Who would ever know?"
    The odds are no one, if you are not drinking, concealing well, and clean cut and not making a fool of yourself or otherwise breaking the law, but, and it's a big but, there's always that chance.
     

  3. USMC - Retired

    USMC - Retired New Member

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    Conservation Rangers (Georgia game wardens) can come on you property without a warrent if they have reason to believe you are breaking game laws. That being said, if your shooting your handgun on your property or for that matter just wearing your gun while out checking your property, you need not worry about a Conservation Ranger ticketing you. Now if your on your property in a treestand with your pistol thats a whole digerent thing. Likewise if your observed stalking game or something like that.

    As long as you don't do your plinking dressed in cammo you should have no problems. In my experience, Georgia Conservation Rangers are very fair in thier dealing with folks and are generally a good bunch of guys.
     
  4. got cope?

    got cope? New Member

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    I figured. No problems with that.

    Hmmm. Ill just keep my fingers crossed :wink:

    Yeah, most of the ones Ive met were quite personable and I figure they'd be very reasonable in a given situation. If I did/could carry while hunting it would be open, in a tacticool leg holster.

    Thanks for the replies guys!
     
  5. viper32cm

    viper32cm New Member

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    My problem with that law is snakes. If I'm carrying a primitive weapon I'm going to want a pistol with snakeshot in it (if nothing else). This law makes that illegal. Which I think is BS.
     
  6. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    I agree that this should be changed. Several other states have changed it. It is not exactly like it is easy to poach deer with my concealed carry snub nose, since it tends to make enough noise to get noticed, but this law falls under the same rule as carry in state parks and on WMAs:

    It is easier to catch guns than poachers.
     
  7. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    http://www.buckeyefirearms.org/article3484.html

    Editor's Note: Ohio's hunters should not be forced to chose between the inalienable right of self-protection and following the wildlife regulations established by a state agency. It is far past time for the Division of Wildlife to recognize that the background-checked CHL-holder is not likely a poacher or a threat to the Wildlfie Officers. Article republished with permission.

    January 3, 2007
    Ohio Outdoor News

    By Dave Golowenski

    Chillicothe, Ohio — The world at large might never know whether Ronnie Copp got his deer, but there’s no doubt the Chillicothe hunter helped authorities get their man.

    The man was fugitive John W. Parsons, a suspected cop killer who had escaped July 29 from the Ross County jail while awaiting trial and then eluded capture for 83 days.

    Residents of Ross and surrounding counties had reason to be shaky until Copp, who was out scouting deer on Oct. 18 not far from downtown Chillicothe, spotted a shack that turned out to be Parsons’ hideout.

    Copp told authorities he was drawn to the shack while following what he recognized as an unusually wide deer trail.

    Click on 'Read More' for the entire story.



    The would-be hunter notified authorities that a ramshackle dwelling covered in shingles and barbed wire apparently had been recently erected and was being occupied behind a lumberyard property. Police and sheriff’s officers located Parsons in the shack the next day.

    “He was found about two miles in a straight line from the Ross County jail,†said Bob Nelson, the Ross County wildlife officer for the DNR Division of Wildlife and early on a member of the manhunt team.

    “The only reason I got involved,†he said, “was that I offered my services to the (Ross County) sheriff’s department and was told they could use all the help I could give them.â€

    Parsons, 35, pleaded guilty Dec. 8 to aggravated murder charges in the April 2005 shooting death of Chillicothe police officer Larry Cox and to charges related to the escape. Parsons was given a life sentence without the possibility of parole.

    Copp, for his part, received $3,130 in reward money from Southern Ohio Crime Stoppers for being the first person to provide information leading to Parsons’ capture and arrest. A spokesman for Crime Stoppers told The Chillicothe Gazette that the amount of the reward was determined by computer based on variety of criteria, including risk to the tipster.

    Considerably more reward money has yet to be doled out. The FBI, which had placed Parsons on its Most Wanted list, offered $100,000, and the U.S. Marshals offered $10,000 for information leading to the capture.

    Copp appears to be less than interested in telling his story, talking about what he planned to do with the reward money or whether his scouting led to a successful deer hunt. Since Parsons’ capture, Copp has not been quoted in the press, and phone calls to his listed phone trigger the message that the number is no longer in service.

    Parsons’ movements during his last weeks as a fugitive might in some ways have been influenced by deer hunters, Nelson said. During the summer, Parsons stayed hidden under heavy brush but later moved to a fishing shack near Massieville, which is located south of Chillicothe.

    “Two guys thought they saw him in the shack†in September, Nelson said.

    Realizing he might have been spotted and with deer season approaching, Parson decided to move at least in part by the fear of getting shot, said FBI agent Michael Kelly in a report obtained by The Columbus Dispatch.

    “He reasoned he did not want to stay in the Massieville area due to the fact that deer season was approaching and he knew the Massieville area was heavily hunted,†Kelly wrote.

    Although Parsons eluded searchers on the ground and in the air for nearly three months, it was the increased scouting activity related to the deer season that finally ended his run.

    Nelson, who was assigned to Ross County in July 2005, said the hunt for a cop killer proved unusual in a job that typically deals with trespassers, firearms-regulation violators, and less commonly with poachers. The wildlife officer, nevertheless, was glad to be part of a team tracking down an undeniable menace to the community.

    “That was the first time most of us had been part of something like that,†he said.


    Related Stories:
    Hello Ohio Division of Wildlife?

    Sportsmen ask Division of Wildlife to allow concealed carry
     
  8. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    By Larry S. Moore

    Cambridge Ohio - At the recent League of Ohio Sportsmen 97th annual convention held at Salt Fork State Lodge near Cambridge, the sportsmen delegates overwhelming adopted a resolution dealing with concealed carry. That resolution, number 05-02, concludes,



    "Resolved, That the League of Ohio Sportsmen requests that the Ohio Division of Wildlife review and update the hunting regulations to permit holders of Concealed Handgun Licenses to carry concealed while hunting in accordance with the concealed handgun law.â€
    The Ohio Division of Wildlife personnel attending the convention did not speak during the discussion of the resolution. The Division has been reviewing and discussing the impact of Ohio’s concealed carry law for hunters, public ranges operated by the Divisions, and other areas.

    We have discussed the issue with the Division at various public meetings. The latest discussions were at the US Sportsmen Alliance Legislative Reception. Feedback from Division personnel has been consistent. Basically they need some time to examine the issues and become comfortable with the law.

    We applaud the Division of Wildlife for examining the regulations and being open to discussion of permitting concealed carry while hunting for the holders of a Concealed Handgun License.

    The annual Division of Wildlife open houses are this Sunday, March 6 from noon to 3:00 PM. Sportsmen interested in concealed carry need to make their voices heard at these events.

    Sportsmen unable to attend the open houses can write:

    Ohio Department of Natural Resources
    Division of Wildlife
    2045 Morse Rd., Bldg. G
    Columbus, OH 43229-6693


    Related Story:
    OFCC issues first ''Division of Wildlife Concealed Carry Status Report''
     
  9. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Recently, Pennsylvania's Governor (a Democrat no less) signed into law a bill allowing hunters with a valid Right-to-Carry permit to carry a concealed handgun while hunting.
    http://www.nraila.org/Legislation/Read.aspx?ID=2503

    HB 2563 will remove any requirements for individuals who are permitted to carry a concealed firearm for protection to disarm while engaged in any activity regulated in the Game Code, including all hunting seasons.
     
  10. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    HB 89 will fix this in Georgia. :D You still must not hunt with the firearm, but you can carry for self defense.
     
  11. AUGuru

    AUGuru Active Member

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    But only for hunters with a GFL?
     
  12. AUGuru

    AUGuru Active Member

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    Great! I've met lots of hunters who don't think they need a GFL for anything. This is at least a reason for the bow hunters to get one.
     
  13. GAGunOwner

    GAGunOwner Active Member

    Wow! I didn't know that. Please explain.
     
  14. dcunited

    dcunited Member

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    Is this because the State Park/WMA parts supersede the other law? This would mean that those who hunt on WMAs are fine but not those who hunt on other lands. Am I correct?

    An aside, would there be any way to read HB 89 to allow carry at Berry College, it is a WMA. My strong guess is no but it would be great if it did, even if only in non-campus parts.
     
  15. RedBeard

    RedBeard New Member

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    Most snakebites occur when some genius is trying to kill a venomous snake. Of course if you have time to kill said venomous snake you have time to leave said venomous snake alone.

    None of the venomous snakes that live in Georgia eat people unless you are a very small, rat-flavored person.
     
  16. RedBeard

    RedBeard New Member

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    What if you are hunting on a PFA?
     
  17. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    I was told that I had already pushed too far when I tried to push a fix to that issue.

    :lol:

    Sorry. I did what I could.
     
  18. RedBeard

    RedBeard New Member

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    I was told that I had already pushed too far when I tried to push a fix to that issue.

    :lol:

    Sorry. I did what I could.[/quote:3kitbg0s]

    So we have to be careful on WMAs that are also PFAs, like Charlie Elliot Wildlife Center in Mansfield.
     
  19. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    PFA's don't exist in Georgia. Reports of sightings of them are normally just folks mistaking a WMA for one. Why do people keep insisting that there are PFA’s in Georgia? All it does is waste my time investigating the “sightings†when I could be focusing on habitat restoration for WMAs…


    :wink: