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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a GFL. I also take Rx Morphine and other pain killers. I have horrible back problems and have had two surgeries so far. With out taking my Rx's, I can not lead a normal life... In other words, the pain is so bad that I can't get out of bed. I've had had back problems for around 5-6 years, and have been seeing a pain management doctor for almost 2 years now.

After reading SB308, and learning the consumtion of alcohol while carrying is legal now, it left me wondering about Rx pills. Am I illegal if I carry after taking them? It was my past understanding that it WAS illegal, but I did not see any langauge about Rx's in the new bill.

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Oh and by the way, I'm not a drug addict, nor do I use my Rx's in any such way. I am a 27 year old who carries the misfortune of having the majority of my body being in absolute agony 24 hours a day. It's horrible.
 

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Georgia doesn't have a specific law about carrying while under the influence of legal drugs or alcohol.

But we do have a DUI law, and it even applies to legal prescription or over-the-counter medication.
Anything that makes you measurably impaired to the extent that you are a "less safe" driver can get you a DUI.

So how do you deal with driving your own vehicle around after you've had your painkillers?

Do the drugs impair your ability to drive, or not affect it, or even improve it (by getting rid of that distracting pain)?

Do your drugs impair your judgment, reasoning, and awareness of what's going on around you? (I'm getting at mental impairment, not just the physical kind).
 

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gunsmoker said:
Georgia doesn't have a specific law about carrying while under the influence of legal drugs or alcohol.

But we do have a DUI law, and it even applies to legal prescription or over-the-counter medication.
Anything that makes you measurably impaired to the extent that you are a "less safe" driver can get you a DUI.

So how do you deal with driving your own vehicle around after you've had your painkillers?

Do the drugs impair your ability to drive, or not affect it, or even improve it (by getting rid of that distracting pain)?

Do your drugs impair your judgment, reasoning, and awareness of what's going on around you? (I'm getting at mental impairment, not just the physical kind).
This man said it all :righton: :righton: :righton: :righton:
 

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Jeff:

I have killer headaches - cluster type. Ya know, the really, really bad ones that come for a while and then go away. Mine came in 1975 and I'm still waiting for them to go away...

Anyway, I also take some super strong pain meds and I've carried while doing so. If you're like me, the meds only make you act normal, so there's no real danger of DUI or CUI or anything like that.

Take care of yourself and don't worry about it.

I feel for you............... Good luck to you!
 

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JeffSmith2208 said:
After reading SB308, and learning the consumption of alcohol while carrying is legal now
It never was illegal except for two short years in one particular location - restaurants. Otherwise, it never has been illegal for the remaining two centuries in any other location in the entire state.
 

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JeffSmith2208 said:
Oh and by the way, I'm not a drug addict
I am not calling you one, but the fact that you made this statement means you need a little wake up call. Please do some research on what it takes to get off morphine after taking it for two years. You may be a little surprised. Mentally, emotionally, and physically, it is more difficult than you think, and check out some research on the body's ability to manage pain without it once you have been taking it for a long time. It just might be an eye opener.

Nobody takes a drug like this for years and is "not an addict."
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Malum Prohibitum said:
I am not calling you one, but the fact that you made this statement means you need a little wake up call. Please do some research on what it takes to get off morphine after taking it for two years. You may be a little surprised. Mentally, emotionally, and physically, it is more difficult than you think, and check out some research on the body's ability to manage pain without it once you have been taking it for a long time. It just might be an eye opener. Nobody takes a drug like this for years and is "not an addict."
I do understand where you are coming from, and I won't drag this out. Honestly thank you for the concern, but I would rather deal with the affects on my body and be able to work, play with my kids, and lead a "normal" life, than lay around my house all day crying from the pain. It is a very hard situation to be in, and I know that unless you deal with it personally you wouldn't understand. My doctor and I talk about this same issue every month...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
gunsmoker said:
Georgia doesn't have a specific law about carrying while under the influence of legal drugs or alcohol.
But we do have a DUI law, and it even applies to legal prescription or over-the-counter medication.
Anything that makes you measurably impaired to the extent that you are a "less safe" driver can get you a DUI.
So how do you deal with driving your own vehicle around after you've had your painkillers?
Do the drugs impair your ability to drive, or not affect it, or even improve it (by getting rid of that distracting pain)?
Do your drugs impair your judgment, reasoning, and awareness of what's going on around you? (I'm getting at mental impairment, not just the physical kind).
Thank you for the clarification! If I don't tell someone I take Rx's, they would have no idea. I know people think "oh he takes morphine, he must stay really messed up", but that couldn't be farther from the truth. And if the pain does get to the point where I have to take more than norma,l then I don't leave home anyhow. I operate one of the biggest mining haul trucks you could imagine, everyday, unimpaired, and undistracted.
 

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Jeff I don't want to go off-topic but have you tried riding a bicycle to help your back?

I'm serious. A friend of mine had a bad back and his doctor told him to try riding a bike(not a stationary) and he lost weight and strengtened his back to the point he was able to get off the drugs.
 

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Malum Prohibitum said:
JeffSmith2208 said:
Oh and by the way, I'm not a drug addict
I am not calling you one, but the fact that you made this statement means you need a little wake up call. Please do some research on what it takes to get off morphine after taking it for two years. You may be a little surprised. Mentally, emotionally, and physically, it is more difficult than you think, and check out some research on the body's ability to manage pain without it once you have been taking it for a long time. It just might be an eye opener.

Nobody takes a drug like this for years and is "not an addict."
I 'm thinking a better term to use than addict might be "abuser". I also have back problems that stem from an injury 4 years ago. It got bad enough last year that I went the pain management route and was taking some pretty heavy duty stuff. Found out that it didn't mix well with one of my other meds and they told me to stop. Wow... after 2 months of daily use coming off of that was horrible. If you've read up on opiate withdrawal, you'll know what I mean.
 

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You are legal but use your best judgement. Under anybody's standard that is some heavy and powerful medication. Even though its not illegal, I don't think it is a good idea to carry in public while heavily medicated. Carry but do so wisely.
 

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JeffSmith2208 said:
unless you deal with it personally you wouldn't understand.
My guess is that until you try to get off of it, personally, you will not understand. I had nothing to say about whether it is necessary in your case to manage pain and function normally, did I? I just think you are in for a very large surprise if you really think that there is no addiction after two years of regular morphine.
 

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Slightly off-topic but .... my idiot gun banning representative wanted to create a database of all Georgians who were proscribed pain and depression meds (Schedule II and higher). If you didn't want to be in the database, she graciously provided that you can opt out and not recieve the medication. Obviously, once the database is created, she'll claim that the people on it shouldn't be eligible for a license.

http://www.legis.state.ga.us/legis/2009_10/fulltext/hb614.htm

We need to keep an eye on this one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
mountainpass said:
Jeff I don't want to go off-topic but have you tried riding a bicycle to help your back?
You know what? That's it! I'll just get on a bicycle and will cure my degenerative disk disease and my back will actually start to rebuild all of the disks that have gone bad. Which, the count from the last doctors visit, is 19 bad disks, 2 good disks, and 2 replaced and fused disks. I've lived three years in agonizing pain before my first back surgery. Excersizing doesn't help to rehydrate disks, it builds muscles. Do you people actually think that I haven't tried every avenue possible before taking this sh*t? I've been through physical therapy, back alignment, excersizing, surgery, massages, painful injections, and patches, among countless others. I even tried closing my eyes really tight, taking a deep breath, and trying to forget about it while simutaniously exhaling and rubbing my ear lobes. All of you also have to remember that doctors don't hand out medicine like this without a patient actually having the need for it. They don't go through with multiple surgeries without there being an actual condition. I'm 27, do you really think that they would put me on this stuff just because I liked the way it made me feal? You think I don't know what it does to my body? My choice is to deal with the possibility of side effects later down the road and live a normal life now, or live a shitty painfull life and watch the world go by from my bedroom window. The pain I go through isn't the "I stubbed my toe pain", it is pure hell. If you want to know what it feals like here is what you do: get someone to run knives up your back while also taking a bench grinder to your bare bone. Then I want you to ball yourselves up and get placed into a lunchbox for 24 hours. And that may give you a little bit of a prelude as to what I go through on a daily basis. Oh and did I mention that I just found out that I need another surgery performed on my thorasic spine. And in this one, they will actually open my ribcage to get through to the disks that need to be replaced. Oh, and a cartiologist also has to be on hand to aid in the surgery because it's so close to my heart. And I thought that the six incisions on my lower back and the 8" incision on my stomach from my first surgery was bad enough. I'm so glad that I have a new game plan though, I'm going to "ride a bike" to overcome all of this. Yippee it's so much more simple that way. I'm pretty sure that if something as mundane as riding a bike was the answer to my degenerative disk disease and rheumatoid arthritis that somewhere along the way my doctors would have suggested it over an operation. But who would have thought...

If any of you have ever broken a bone or had a migraine did you go excersize or try stretching? It isn't a mental need. It may be hard for y'all to get your heads wrapped around this concept, but I actually have deteriorated disks in my back. I have nerves that get pressed on that cause my legs to drop out from under me, and pain to the point that I can't get out of bed. This is no mental need, it is a physical one. Oh and by the way, I do work out. The only reason I can manage to do so is because I am prescibed medicine, by my doctor, that manages my pain so that I may live a "normal" life just like those of you who do not have to deal with this condition. Again, excersizing works your muscles, not your bones.

I have a beautiful wife and four children (including one with special needs) that I love to live my life with. Without pain management I can not do everday activities that many of you take for granted such as driving, playing with my children, or anything that you would require not laying in bed. Thanks for your "concern" but you have no idea of the challenges that I go through every day. And until you do, don't shake your fingers at me in disapproval.
 

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You know what? That's it! I'll just get on a bicycle and will cure my degenerative disk disease and my back will actually start to rebuild all of the disks that have gone bad.
I'm so glad that I have a new game plan though, I'm going to "ride a bike" to overcome all of this.
Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
mountainpass said:
You know what? That's it! I'll just get on a bicycle and will cure my degenerative disk disease and my back will actually start to rebuild all of the disks that have gone bad.
[quote:2twglnpj] I'm so glad that I have a new game plan though, I'm going to "ride a bike" to overcome all of this.
Good luck.[/quote:2twglnpj]

Apparently I don't need luck, just a bicycle...
 

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Tech5 said:
gunsmoker said:
Georgia doesn't have a specific law about carrying while under the influence of legal drugs or alcohol.

But we do have a DUI law, and it even applies to legal prescription or over-the-counter medication.
Anything that makes you measurably impaired to the extent that you are a "less safe" driver can get you a DUI.

So how do you deal with driving your own vehicle around after you've had your painkillers?

Do the drugs impair your ability to drive, or not affect it, or even improve it (by getting rid of that distracting pain)?

Do your drugs impair your judgment, reasoning, and awareness of what's going on around you? (I'm getting at mental impairment, not just the physical kind).
This man said it all :righton: :righton: :righton: :righton:
Unfortunately, there's more:

Discharging your weapon under the influence of drugs or alcohol is a crime. 16-11-134. You may not think you are under the influence of your prescription drug, but an officer might. Hopefully, this will never occur.

I have practiced both DUI defense and personal injury for over ten years so I have had many clients that have had similar problems as the OP. It seems like driving while taking prescripton morphine means its just a matter of time before a DUI drugs charge.

To the OP: Have you tried any machnes? Like VAX-D?
 

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JeffSmith2208 said:
don't shake your fingers at me in disapproval.
I have reviewed the thread and found nothing like this. Nothing. Why the persecution complex?
 

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Macktee said:
Anyway, I also take some super strong pain meds and I've carried while doing so. If you're like me, the meds only make you act normal, so there's no real danger of DUI or CUI or anything like that.
There is a very real danger of DUI charges when using powerful opiate derivatives. It doesn't matter if you have a prescription and valid need, or buy then in the street. I feel for those in pain and support their access to pain meds, but let's not mislead people into thinking they can't get a DUI for therapeutic levels of Percocet. It happens.

I can understand the argument that driving with some level of opiates in your bloodstream is better than driving with extreme pain. The law doesn't factor that in though. Even lower grade painkillers like hydrocodone (like in Vicodin) have some risk of DUI. Also, just because you don't appear intoxicated (most people don't judge this well for themselves anyway) doesn't mean you won't get a DUI. You could be in an accident that is not your fault. Blood drawn at the hospital could result in charges. Long term users are at greater risk, because the police aren't going to factor in their increased tolerance when they see the lab results.

Not trying to be judgmental here. After a painful back injury I had to make these decisions for myself. I feel lucky now to be out of pain.
 
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