Canadian Gun Registry Fails

Discussion in 'In the News' started by adcurt, Sep 8, 2007.

  1. adcurt

    adcurt New Member

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    I've been following this stupidity for years and the real numbers have been coming in that proves that gun registries do not work (I know, big surprise to you fellas). The following is an editorial, but sums up the issue pretty well. Surprisingly, I can't find a reasonable and straightforward Canadian news piece on this. I wonder why?

    A couple of my favorite things about their program that American gun-haters are desperate to emulate:

    1. Proposed cost: $2 million. Total. "Fees will pay for the system."
    Actual Cost: $2 Billion and still counting... How many cops would that have paid for?

    2. Number of crimes solved by the registry program: Zero. Not one.

    Oh, it's too good; Let me repeat that again as I laugh my arse off: Zero crimes solved by the registry since 1995, but they paid $2,000,000,000 for the privildge of surrendering their right. Classic example of Socialism at work.

    3. Their crime rate has doubled since they enacted the 1995 bill. Doubled. And is much higher, per capita, that in the US. All of this as our crime rate has steadily decreased as many state's have worked to decrease gun restrictions. Libs really, really don't want to discuss this.

    ---Article--- link at the end.

    "Canada has required the registration of all handguns since 1934. It has never, ever, once been used to solve a crime reports Canadian Member of Parliament, Garry Breitkreuz (a Conservative from Saskatchewan) in an interview with me on my Live Fire radio show.

    Now the Canadian socialist government has added registration of rifles to the list of what Big Brother wants the peons to tell him about. They also are supposed to be licensed to own a long gun, as well. Only a socialist could demand the expansion of a government program that has already failed.

    Breitkreuz cited the Toronto Police Chief, Julian Fantino, who has called gun registration a waste of cash. This is partly due to the fact that about 75 percent of the handguns used in crime in Toronto were never registered. The money would be better spent on real cops doing real police work according to the chief. Many other Canadian police officials have publicly decried the waste of resources poured down the gun registration drain.

    One of the concerns of gun registration everywhere is the potential for abuse. Breitkruez reports that there have been some suspicious break-ins of the homes of gun owners. It may be that the break-ins occurred with the help of information obtained illegally from the registry.

    Another downside of the gun registry has been the deterioration of relations between police and other citizens. The registry treats people as suspects, and many Canadians have simply refused to register their guns. Nobody knows how many, but the number is generally put at several hundred thousand.

    For most Canadians, the biggest scandal of the gun registry is the enormous cost overrun and the subsequent cover-up. The registry was supposed to cost a net of $2 million (Canadian dollars) after fees were collected. To date, the registry has cost over $2 billion and counting. A computer crash has compromised the integrity of the system as well.

    The Auditor of Canada found that the overrun had occurred, but the government was so uncooperative that the audit could not be completed. The Auditor's report revealed a massive cover-up of the cost overrun.

    In an encouraging example of interposition (a lesser official stepping in to block the rebellion of a higher official), eight of Canada's provincial governments have declared that they will not enforce the registry. In Canada, the provinces are the primary agency used to enforce federal criminal laws.

    To date, a number of openly non-registered gun owners have been unable to provoke their arrest in order to get the case into court. So far, the government has ignored these opportunities like the plague.

    It seems as if the socialist Liberal government has a tar baby they can't get rid of. They falsified crime data to get the registry law enacted. They promised a virtually no-cost system. All of that is falling down around them, but the "integrity" of the government is at stake and the Liberals continue pushing ahead -- even though they seem headed for a cliff.

    The registry law moves Canada far along the road to a police state by authorizing searches without warrant. Applicants must also respond to questions about their love lives or marital relations. After gun owners have their privacy and personal sovereignty invaded, it is not hard to imagine the rest of the country being forced to this level of transparency as well.

    This is not gun control. This is state control of the people. The good news is that more and more Canadians want to close the registry. In the meantime, many are unwilling to comply with this exercise of socialist tyranny."

    (Garry Brietkreuz's web site, where the complete record of the failure of the gun registry is housed, is http://www.garrybreitkreuz.com. The Live Fire interview with Brietkreuz can be found at http://www.gunowners.org/radio.htm.)
     
  2. Macktee

    Macktee New Member

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    The Conservative Party has made ending the registry a major part of their platform over the past couple of years. As soon as they have a majority in Parliament, they'll almost certainly do so.
     

  3. adcurt

    adcurt New Member

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    Yep and hopefully for Canadians it'll happen with a quickness.
     
  4. M249

    M249 New Member

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    I wish the Canucks the best of luck in repealing this system. The registry can only lead to the gun grabs we observed in the UK and Australia.
     
  5. Vir Quisque Vir

    Vir Quisque Vir New Member

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    Remember the sequence for the U.S.!

    "I wish the Canucks the best of luck in repealing this system. The registry can only lead to the gun grabs we observed in the UK and Australia."

    The likely sequence for the U.S. is:

    1. federal registration of all firearms, coded to serial number, name, physical address and social security number.
    2. one or two buy-backs
    3. confiscation
    4. destruction

    If the feds get cute, they will do state registrations willy-nilly and then combine them to get a federal registry. From my understanding, the Canadians are already regretting losing their firearms, with crime and government control NOT a good idea. We do NOT need to repeat that here. D.C., NY and Chicago already have a good taste of what it is like already. Go Heller!
     
  6. fallison

    fallison Guest

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    Re: Remember the sequence for the U.S.!

    #1 can be done with probably 75% effectiveness by simply passing a law requiring all FFLs to turn their bound books in to the BATF and entering them into a database.
     
  7. Mobster989

    Mobster989 New Member

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    How long are the FFLs required to keep records of who they sold their guns to?

    They could probably also register who the gun owners are by using the NICS. If they are to the point of confiscation they aren't going to care about the 4th amendment either (it's already been weakened since 9/11 by the GWOT), so they'll do searches of the people who've been checked with NICS when buying a firearm. They could also use state-issued licenses to track down gun owners, although that is not as reliable since some states don't have licenses for certain modes of carry and/or ownership.

    I think they'd have a penalty-free grace period of say 6-12 months for firearm turn-ins, long enough for the sheeple to turn in their guns. Then they'd go after those who didn't turn their guns in. That's when you'll be glad you invested in all that military surplus gear. :twisted:
     
  8. ptsmith24

    ptsmith24 New Member

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    I don't think 03 have to keep the records once they don't have their license anymore, but 01 has to turn records in when they go out of business.

    By January 2009, I should be living in a different state. Not sure that it matters if they're going to follow 4473s.
     
  9. Vir Quisque Vir

    Vir Quisque Vir New Member

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    I thought Congress passed a law forbidding long term database storage of firearm records, except ATF does I believe, keep the records of firearms dealers that closed. Of course, ATF is involved in a LOT of closings for relatively small technical violations. If this is correct, it would take Congress's vote to permit databased firearm records. The thing to remember is this "registration" is step 1 leading to confiscation. You have to know what guns of who are located where and by whom. I am suspicious of firearms registration, not registration per se, but rather intent. I am far more suspicious of motives of those who would take firearms away. Maybe the founders got it right, tyranny of government over its citizens and not just self-defense. Smart guys!
     
  10. Mobster989

    Mobster989 New Member

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    Except the ATF seems to me the kind of agency to break the law when it makes their job easier and no one finds out. It's sort of like how the CIA is with wire-tapping and torturing individuals. There is no one to hold these federal agencies accountable. They may report to certain congressmen, but it's not that hard to fix reports and lie. I'm curious as to how many spot inspections they've had from outside investigators.