Before 2A - The Requirement to Keep and Bear Arms

Discussion in 'Off-topic' started by AtlPhilip, Jan 17, 2018.

  1. AtlPhilip

    AtlPhilip Proud GCO member.

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    While doing some genealogy research I found this passage about one of my ancestors:

    "All men, between 16 and 60, were required to muster and train in the local militia, or trainband. They were required to have a rifle, bullets and powder. It was a frequent court complaint that someone didn't have enough bullets and/or powder. Abraham, 7 Sept 1652, was complained of for not having bullets, and not having armes for his man. His man (an apprentice or helper probably) was by Abraham's testimony of "small groweth" and he couldn't get arms to fit him. He also said he thought he had enough bullets, but didn't, and had already acquired them. He was fined 18d instead of 10s., and warned that he would be fined severely if he didn't get arms for his man."

    One hundred and forty years before the US Constitution.
     

  2. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Is your ancestor Abraham or the man of small groweth?
     
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  3. AtlPhilip

    AtlPhilip Proud GCO member.

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  4. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Very interesting find relating to the requirement to keep arms. Just a suggestion - Send it to Clayton Cramer.

    Just curious, how did you start this research?
     
  5. AtlPhilip

    AtlPhilip Proud GCO member.

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    I've been researching my family tree for many years now. As I exhausted first hand information from family, I started branching out to online sources, death certificates, etc. Fortunately, Doolittle is not a common name and there is a national group that called the Doolittles of America that keeps the "official" family tree back to immigration for many family groups. Over time, and with their help/validation, I was able to bridge the gap between their tree and mine, leading me back to Abraham.

    From there, it was just curiosity. Who was this guy? What was life as a first generation immigrant like? What was he like? And in that reading, I found the passage above.
     
  6. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

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    Where would you suggest a person interested in this start, assuming not many older folks on several branches of the family are still around and not a lot of information is currently available to this person?
     
  7. Mafuta54

    Mafuta54 Active Member

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    Familysearch.org
     
  8. AtlPhilip

    AtlPhilip Proud GCO member.

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    Start by writing down as much as you know, even if it doesn't seem relevant. I know that sounds obvious, but genealogy is a puzzle small pieces will often connect you to larger pools of data.

    For example: Do you know where uncle mike is buried? Cemeteries often keep good records. And families are often buried together and ordered by date.

    Also, use genealogy software. I recommend Legacy. Full featured, and free.

    There are a number of sites (listed below). But those sites usually hide the living. You will need to work up what you can from you to the dead.
    http://files.usgwarchives.net/ (free)
    https://www.wikitree.com/ (Free and pay)
    https://www.geni.com/home (free)
    http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com (Good - but Currently offline)
    https://www.ancestry.com/ (More pay than free)
    https://www.findagrave.com/ (free)
    https://www.accessgenealogy.com (free)
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2018
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  9. AtlPhilip

    AtlPhilip Proud GCO member.

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    Here is an example. This file is the record for my grandparents cemetery:

    And here they are:
    Wallace, Ethel [Jul 30] 1906 [Feb 25] 1989 [Young]
    Wallace, E. Herbert [Jul 29] 1907 [Feb] 1976 [S/o William R. Wallace & Nancy A.A. Sparks]

    From this I now know she was born a Young and his parents were William R. Wallace & Nancy A.A. Sparks. So I take that and keep looking. Further down I find:

    Wallace, W.R. [William Robert] Sep 14, 1869 Dec 28, 1946 [Son of John Henry Wallace and Ellen Price]
    Wallace, Nancy Jul 15, 1873 Mar 30, 1941 [D/o Dennis McFranklin Sparks & Julia A. McCoy]

    And just like that I have my first Civil war veteran

    Sparks, D.M. [Dennis McFranklin] Nov 18, 1847 Jul 15, 1934 [Son of Uriah Sparks and Sarah Whatley]
    [Hardee's Battalion Alabama Cavalry]
    So we start Googling "Hardee's Battalion Alabama" and we find:
    http://files.usgwarchives.net/al/clay/military/civilwar/rosters/majorjos409gmt.txt

    Which contains:
    "Sparks, D.M [Dennis]
    [Born Nov 18, 1847, died Jul 14, 1934, buried Shiloh-Lineville Clay County AL]"

    Had we not known his birth/death, would now. Notice that the date of death disagrees?
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2018