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Seasteading Aficionado
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Brand new Cole-Haan leather shoes, just my size: $5. Four matching framed prints of old Roman coins: $4. Ralph Lauren windowpane-checked three-button suit: $20. Waist-length mink coat: $32. Real pearl and rare stone necklace: $3.50. Hand-painted wine carafe imported from Israel: $2. Twinkie warmer circa 1983: $1.50.

I’m talking thrift store here, as in Goodwill. You got $20 in your pocket, so time to pop some tags.

You would never shop there, right? Well, why not? Don’t let snobbery stop you. There are amazing things in the Goodwill, or any thrift store, but you have to have the right attitude, an eagle eye, a sense of adventure, and a love of lost treasure.
https://fee.org/articles/be-the-master-of-the-thrift-store/

I love this article and I love that because of capitalism, we just give away great items and somebody can come in, pay near nothing, and leave the store with it. God bless capitalism, and I love thrift stores.

"I'm gonna pop some tags
Only got twenty dollars in my pocket
I - I - I'm hunting, looking for a come-up"

"I wear your granddad's clothes
I look incredible
I'm in this big ass coat
From that thrift shop down the road"

NSFW

 

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I've done thrift stores for years, although I could care less about finding mink and pearls and am more interested in work clothes and stuff I can wear outdoors in extreme weather like silk or wool sweaters and undershirts without paying a high price for an item I'm just going to get dirty and stinky.

My daughter makes a bunch of her clothes from things she buys at Salvation Army and modifies to her style and fit. She made her prom dress from a Salvation Army dress.

My experience has been that as the economy does worse, people are much less likely to throw away good stuff and there are more people looking for good stuff in the thrift shops. So it gets harder and harder to find the really rare gems. It's kind of like panning for gold... you may have to spend a few hours across a few weeks searching through junk to find a nugget. Ten years ago, the picking was much better than today.

Back in the 80s, I knew a guy that bought all his clothes at the SA, and when they got dirty he'd donate them again and buy new ones. Back then most things were .25 or even less, so it was actually cheaper than dry cleaning.

Two tips: Salvation Army has clothing at half price on Wed. And SA is quite a bit cheaper than Goodwill even on full price days. Goodwill is no longer "not for profit" while Salvation Army helps those in need, mostly by giving them jobs in store.

Az
 

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Seasteading Aficionado
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44,900 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've done thrift stores for years, although I could care less about finding mink and pearls and am more interested in work clothes and stuff I can wear outdoors in extreme weather like silk or wool sweaters and undershirts without paying a high price for an item I'm just going to get dirty and stinky.

My daughter makes a bunch of her clothes from things she buys at Salvation Army and modifies to her style and fit. She made her prom dress from a Salvation Army dress.

My experience has been that as the economy does worse, people are much less likely to throw away good stuff and there are more people looking for good stuff in the thrift shops. So it gets harder and harder to find the really rare gems. It's kind of like panning for gold... you may have to spend a few hours across a few weeks searching through junk to find a nugget. Ten years ago, the picking was much better than today.

Back in the 80s, I knew a guy that bought all his clothes at the SA, and when they got dirty he'd donate them again and buy new ones. Back then most things were .25 or even less, so it was actually cheaper than dry cleaning.

Two tips: Salvation Army has clothing at half price on Wed. And SA is quite a bit cheaper than Goodwill even on full price days. Goodwill is no longer "not for profit" while Salvation Army helps those in need, mostly by giving them jobs in store.

Az
Great post and thank you so much. I really appreciate the good tips. :)
 

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I stopped into the Goodwill store in Alpharetta some 13 years ago.
It was senior day or some such with additional big discount.

I hid my face in embarrassment and bought the Mephisto loafers that fit perfectly and looked brand new. I never heard of that brand but for less than $4.00 drive-out how could I go wrong?

This was an expensive mistake since I have had to replace them twice, they are that good.
 

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Seasteading Aficionado
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44,900 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I stopped into the Goodwill store in Alpharetta some 13 years ago.
It was senior day or some such with additional big discount.

I hid my face in embarrassment and bought the Mephisto loafers that fit perfectly and looked brand new. I never heard of that brand but for less than $4.00 drive-out how could I go wrong?

This was an expensive mistake since I have had to replace them twice, they are that good.
Haha truth
 

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Lawyer and Gun Activist
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28,534 Posts
Goodwill

I found an acrylic - encased set of Weatherby Magnum rifle cartridges at Goodwill for $6 one time. And I had a cartridge collection back then (now it's on permanent loan to Ga. Firing line in Marietta).

These Weatherby cartridges are a collectors' item, worth a few hundred bucks according to some sellers.
 

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Seasteading Aficionado
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44,900 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I found an acrylic - encased set of Weatherby Magnum rifle cartridges at Goodwill for $6 one time. And I had a cartridge collection back then (now it's on permanent loan to Ga. Firing line in Marietta).

These Weatherby cartridges are a collectors' item, worth a few hundred bucks according to some sellers.
Wow, great find! Thank you for sharing! :righton:
 

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Yukon Cornelius
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One of my neighbors would go on motorcycle trips and wouldn't take extra clothes he's just buy some from a thrift store and leave the ones he was wearing. Good way to travel light
 

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I've done thrift stores for years, although I could care less about finding mink and pearls and am more interested in work clothes and stuff I can wear outdoors in extreme weather like silk or wool sweaters and undershirts without paying a high price for an item I'm just going to get dirty and stinky.

My daughter makes a bunch of her clothes from things she buys at Salvation Army and modifies to her style and fit. She made her prom dress from a Salvation Army dress.

My experience has been that as the economy does worse, people are much less likely to throw away good stuff and there are more people looking for good stuff in the thrift shops. So it gets harder and harder to find the really rare gems. It's kind of like panning for gold... you may have to spend a few hours across a few weeks searching through junk to find a nugget. Ten years ago, the picking was much better than today.

Back in the 80s, I knew a guy that bought all his clothes at the SA, and when they got dirty he'd donate them again and buy new ones. Back then most things were .25 or even less, so it was actually cheaper than dry cleaning.

Two tips: Salvation Army has clothing at half price on Wed. And SA is quite a bit cheaper than Goodwill even on full price days. Goodwill is no longer "not for profit" while Salvation Army helps those in need, mostly by giving them jobs in store.

Az
Anytime someone asked my grandmother where she got that outfit she'd say the s&a boutique
 

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Lawyer and Gun Activist
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Clean

Nobody should donate dirty (un laundered) clothes.
Thrift stores don't wash them.
Dirty ones will stink up everything else near them on the rack.
At least WASH and dry your clothes, but if you do that to some items it will ruin them
 

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Seasteading Aficionado
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44,900 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Nobody should donate dirty (un laundered) clothes.
Thrift stores don't wash them.
Dirty ones will stink up everything else near them on the rack.
At least WASH and dry your clothes, but if you do that to some items it will ruin them
Agreed, when I donate to thrift stores, I always make sure all items are completely clean and clothes smelling great when I drop them off. Those scent enhancers by gain do a great job of keeping that clean smell lasting days or weeks on clothes, even on a rack. :)
 

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Nobody should donate dirty (un laundered) clothes.
Thrift stores don't wash them.
Dirty ones will stink up everything else near them on the rack.
At least WASH and dry your clothes, but if you do that to some items it will ruin them
I asked at the Salvation Army store and they said they laundered everything.

Maybe other stores don't? Maybe the person I talked to was mistaken?

Az
 

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Token Liberal Hippie
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I'm pretty sure goodwill washes the clothes. It's part of their job creation. Employ those who would be otherwise unemployable (the mentally disabled, felons, and the like). Another reason I've found to admire them.
 

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I'm pretty sure goodwill washes the clothes. It's part of their job creation. Employ those who would be otherwise unemployable (the mentally disabled, felons, and the like). Another reason I've found to admire them.
My only quarrel with goodwill is that they don't allow lawful carry inside their stores. However that's their right to restrict it.

It won't stop me from donating though. Our local donation spot I don't have to even go inside and they don't mind me OC when donating at least.
 

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Shop there all the time....It's kinda of a hobby of the wife and myself, most of my work shirts come from thrift stores and yard sales.

Brian
 

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We do a lot of thrift store and flea market prowling. My wife does better with clothes finds that me, but I still find all kinds of cool stuff like my pro quality Nokona fielder's mitt that was marked $5 and when I picked it up the guy said he'd take $3 for it.
Also, and I think I might have mentioned this earlier, the $400+ Russell chukka boots (made in WI) that I picked up for $150 off a motorcycle board's flea market section.
 
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