Armed Citizen With Permit Stopped Last VA College Rampage

Discussion in 'In the News' started by jgullock, Apr 17, 2007.

  1. jgullock

    jgullock Active Member

    1,667
    7
    38
    http://www.cnsnews.com/ViewNation.asp?P ... 0917a.html

    Student Group Wants Campus Gun Ban Lifted
    By Christine Hall
    CNSNews.com Staff Writer
    September 17, 2002

    (CNSNews.com) - After two armed southwest Virginia law students stopped a campus shooting rampage in January, a Second Amendment group at a northern Virginia law school decided it was time to change their own school's ban on guns.

    "We are trying to build a detailed and persuasive brief that would include statistics on increases in safety, decreases in violent crime when you do have concealed carry permit holders in a jurisdiction," said Orest J. Jowyk, president of the Second Amendment group at George Mason University School of Law.

    "I think the middle ground is to allow concealed handgun permit holders to carry just like they can anywhere else in Virginia," he said. "You provide extra safety to the student body that way."

    Jowyk began researching his law school's gun policy following the January incident in which a disgruntled student at Appalachian Law School, Peter Odighizuwa, allegedly shot and killed the school's dean, a professor and a student on campus before being subdued by two armed students, Mikael Gross and Tracy Bridges.

    Gross and Bridges reportedly ran to their cars to fetch their own guns and returned to confront Odighizuwa, who surrendered after allegedly initiating a fistfight.

    Jowyk was heartened by the students' intervention. But looking into GMU's gun policy, Jowyk found to his dismay that the school's board of visitors had in 1995 passed a ban on all weapons, concealed or otherwise, except by law enforcement officials.

    Anyone who violates the school's gun ban would face administrative repercussions but not criminal charges, according to Jowyk.

    Then in April, Virginia's Democratic governor, Mark Warner, signed a law prohibiting local governments from using administrative rules to pass gun restrictions that go beyond existing state law.

    Jowyk's Second Amendment group is now investigating how that law might apply to GMU, though the group has not yet approached school administrators about changing the policy.

    "There is a question that's being bandied about in the Commonwealth whether or not this university qualifies under that law as a locality," said Mike Lynch, chief of police for GMU law school's police department. "Today, I don't think we have the answer."

    If that legal question is eventually resolved in the school's favor, Lynch says he will likely recommend that the weapons ban continue.

    "The more people that have guns...on them, it is my opinion that that would increase the propensity for somebody getting hurt," either through accident or mischief, said Lynch. "And I don't want to see that."

    But the controversy surrounding gun bans on state colleges and universities isn't limited to Virginia.

    In January, the Utah legislature launched an inquiry into the University of Utah's 25-year-old gun ban after state Attorney General Mark Shurtleff said state laws on concealed weapons prohibited agencies and schools from banning them from state property.

    "We need to have the right to exclude weapons on campus," University of Utah President Bernie Machen testified to legislators, describing the decision as a matter of academic freedom. "If it ain't broke, don't fix it," he said. Machen has also argued that the ban fosters a safe learning environment.

    On March 6, the Utah Senate passed a GOP-sponsored bill allowing the legislature to cut in half the school's administration budget if the gun ban continues. The university responded two weeks later by initiating a court challenge, asking a U.S. District Court judge to uphold the school's gun ban.

    Also in March, Ohio University's 2000 "workforce violence policy" prohibiting any carrying or displaying of weapons became the subject of controversy when a journalism professor was directed to remove a Civil War-era gun he had displayed on his wall for more than a decade. University administrators reportedly are re-evaluating the policy.

    "I feel like I've really been fingered as a dangerous person," Patrick Washburn told the University Wire.
     
  2. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

    63,387
    394
    83
    Re: Armed Citizen With Permit Stopped Last VA College Rampag

    Wow, I can't believe the Chief is going to disarm his officers.
     

  3. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

    63,387
    394
    83
    Re: Armed Citizen With Permit Stopped Last VA College Rampag

    So, did they win? It has been five years. These students are lawyers now.
     
  4. viper32cm

    viper32cm New Member

    760
    0
    0
    I'd like to point out that if such an incident occured at Emory, myself plus the 3 other permit holders I'm aware of would be powerless to stop such a killer.

    I can't even bring a decent folding knife to school.
     
  5. Rammstein

    Rammstein New Member

    5,798
    0
    0
    In my English class today we talked about the VT massacre.

    After the conversation went on for a bit I brought up how there was a bill to allow concealed carry and that it was shot down.

    Many were opposed to allowing carry on campus. So I said "I am licensed to carry a firearm in this state. Why am I suddenly not to be trusted when I step foot on this campus? How am I different?" Their argument was that while I may be responsible others may not. I brought up that anyone with money can buy a car and act wreackless. Then I used some more examples along the same lines. Then I said, "Has everyone here seen the rent-a-cops we have at this school? Do you feel confident that they will protect you?" Everyone agreed that the rent-a-cops were useless. Then they said that the police would come to help them. I told them that the police have no duty to protect people per the Supreme Court and then I said, "you mean the cops are going to protect you...like they did at Columbine...or like they did yesterday? No, they won't. They are going to do the same damn thing. They are going to stand around outside with their rifles and their pistols and not go inside. They are not going to come rescue you." But it was after I said this that all but one kid 'got it'. I said "If it were legal to carry my pistol on campus I would. And if right now, this very minute, some mad man with a gun walks into this classroom, as did the guy in Virginia, and he starts shooting...would you rather me have my gun or not? Ask yourself that. Put yourself in their shoes, the shoes of the people that died yesterday. Would they have wanted a person with a firearms license to be there or not?" A bunch of people sorta looked off into space and started nodding their head in the affirmative.
     
  6. ptsmith24

    ptsmith24 New Member

    8,809
    0
    0
    =D>
     
  7. Malum Prohibitum

    Malum Prohibitum Moderator Staff Member

    63,387
    394
    83
    Aren't you writing paper on a gun law issue?
     
  8. Rammstein

    Rammstein New Member

    5,798
    0
    0
    I am. About Georgia probate judges ignoring the law.
     
  9. glockgirl

    glockgirl New Member

    997
    0
    0
    Ramm you're my hero....
     
  10. Foul

    Foul New Member

    780
    0
    0
    Hat's off to you Ram!
    Way to bring the point home.

    That story may have seemed a little harsh for some, but sometimes the truth is a hard pill to swallow.
     
  11. Adam5

    Adam5 Atlanta Overwatch

    13,288
    60
    48
    =D> :bowdown: :goldstar: \:D/ :mrgreen: :cheers:
     
  12. Rammstein

    Rammstein New Member

    5,798
    0
    0
    A few went :shock: when I said I have a permit and carry everywhere I can.

    One of the fence sitters asked me why I felt I needed to carry in Statesboro, because there is low crime and it is safe here. I told her I bet the students at Virginia Tech probably thought the same thing two days ago. After that she agreed with I said.

    She surprised me since she seems like she is mostly libertarian on the issues we have talked about in class. I'm glad she sees it my way now.