Anyone knowledgeable about Makarovs?

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by Adam5, Oct 2, 2018.

  1. Adam5

    Adam5 Atlanta Overwatch

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    Do we have any Makarov experts here? I’m looking at buying a Russian Makarov in .380acp. Is there anything special that I need to look out for or being careful of?
     
  2. Harhib

    Harhib Active Member

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    While not an expert I have fired one and know people that own them. No real problems that I know of. They are like anything else the Russians design and build reliable and built to last. Consider the AK-47. Accuracy is supposed to be acceptable . Hope this helps.
     

  3. Wegahe

    Wegahe NRA Instructor

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    Fixed it for you.
     
  4. Harhib

    Harhib Active Member

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  5. Phil1979

    Phil1979 Member Georgia Carry

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  6. Archangel

    Archangel Moderator Staff Member

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    This link isn't for a Makarov it's for an FEG PA63 chambered in 9x18 Makarov.

    Makarov is on the left FEG PA63 is on the right.

    Makarov vs PA63.png
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2018
  7. UtiPossidetis

    UtiPossidetis American

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    I used to have one, but my PA-63 is MUCH better in most ways (and it takes 380 not the Makarov round). As with any auto, check fit & finish, look for wear on the moving parts, for eastern European and Soviet surplus weapons a field strip looking for ANY signs of rust is mandatory. As was said, Wolff springs (weapon AND magazine) are a must IMHO. Good luck.
     
  8. latter_day_hippie

    latter_day_hippie Well-Known Member

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    I own three, two Russians in .380 and one Bulgarian in 9x18mm. They are excellent firearms, very durable and reliable, and very accurate thanks to their direct blowback design. A couple of things to take a look at before buying:

    1. Make sure that the manual safety requires enough pressure to engage such that incidental contact during recoil will not move it enough to engage it (and thus prevent the next round from being fired). The detent spring wears down over time and can introduce enough play to allow that to happen. It is an easy fix - replace the detent spring or the entire safety catch assembly -- both parts are a few dollars and readily available, and it takes about 30 seconds and no tools to do.

    2. Assuming this is a Baikal made for the commercial market, it will have an rear adjustable sight. Make sure that it is holding its set position (gentle pressure on the sight left, right, up, and down) as they can get loose over time. A little LockTite can help it stay where you want it, but I recommend replacing it with a fixed sight - available online for a few dollars and is a one-screw replacement).

    3. As Phil mentioned in an earlier post, check the condition of the recoil spring and as many others as you can get to. Plan on replacing them all eventually. Usually less than $50 for a kit and worth every penny.

    Some things to consider post-purchase:

    1. Stock grips on most Makarovs are pretty terrible. A Hogue overgrip can help. Pachmeyer makes a replacement set that are comfortable and durable. If you want to spring a little and can wait a bit, Dennis Marschalko in Hungary does custom wooden grips to order for them that are amazing (www.marschalgrips.com).

    2. There are some great IWB and OWB holster options available. Many, but not all, Bersa .380 holsters and Kahr P9 holsters will accommodate the Makarovs comfortably.

    3. Makarov.com, once a retailer of accessories and parts, remains online as an information archive and has a lot of great information.

    Hope that helps, and let me know if I can answer any other questions.
     
    UtiPossidetis likes this.
  9. Adam5

    Adam5 Atlanta Overwatch

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    I picked it up during lunch today. It’s on very good shape. No finish issues, very tight action, no play in the adjustable sight. The single action is pretty good, but the double action feels like it’s 100lbs. I will likely get a holster and carry it from time to time, but it will not
    be in my normal carry rotation. I will probably get nicer grips for it.

    IMG_2143.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2018
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  10. latter_day_hippie

    latter_day_hippie Well-Known Member

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    The Marschalko grips are awesome...

    upload_2018-10-6_7-41-24.jpeg
     
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  11. UtiPossidetis

    UtiPossidetis American

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    I had the same issue with my PA-63. Changing out the mainspring for a lighter one from Wolff solved that issue for me. I bought a combo package with 3 weights and took them to the range to make certain I had no light primer strikers. Old Soviet ammo had HARD primers and so the springs were way too heavy for comfort but were necessary to ensure consistent ignition of their ammo. Modern commercial ammo primers are nowhere near as hard so a lighter spring both works and makes the trigger much more pleasant to shoot.
     
  12. Phil1979

    Phil1979 Member Georgia Carry

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    What is the original pull weight?
     
  13. UtiPossidetis

    UtiPossidetis American

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    Maxed out at 12+ lbs. New spring is 13lbs vs the original that many say online was 20lbs rated. New DA pull is 8lbs which is very doable and makes it a great shooter.
     
  14. Adam5

    Adam5 Atlanta Overwatch

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    I just fixed my last post. I should have proofread it before posting from my phone.