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Discussion Starter #1
I remember Signal69 doing a class at the GCO Convention and discussing this problem - trying to find the holster mouth with the end of the weapon while reholstering.

"Agent who protects Nancy Reagan shoots self in hip"

http://dailycaller.com/2011/02/05/agent ... lf-in-hip/
 

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Member Georgia Carry
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Call me nuts, but I keep my finger OFF the trigger while re-holstering.
 

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Lawyer and Gun Activist
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Yeah, I've had trouble finding the opening of my holster before.
For IWB holsters I've had them squeezed shut by my belt, so I had to use the muzzle of the pistol to pry it open again before re-holstering.
Never with my finger on the trigger! (or so I think. I hope!)
Anyhow, I've poked myself in the hip but never shot myself in the hip.

Let's make sure to mention this case to anybody who says civilians need mandatory training with guns, or that civilians can't be trusted with guns because LEO types are the "only ones professional enough".
 

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gunsmoker said:
Let's make sure to mention this case to anybody who says civilians need mandatory training with guns, or that civilians can't be trusted with guns because LEO types are the "only ones professional enough".
I've noticed the new talking-point in opposing arguments lately has been, "Not even highly-trained police can do this well, and you want anybody to be allowed to do it?!?!"

My first thought about this incident was "Glock?" but Secret Service carries SIG P229s, don't they? The spec on that is 12# trigger pull. That's a lot for an ND while holstering.
 

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Rugerer said:
My first thought about this incident was "Glock?" but Secret Service carries SIG P229s, don't they? The spec on that is 12# trigger pull. That's a lot for an ND while holstering.
That's correct, 10 lbs trigger pull, unless the trigger pull has been modified. Its my daily carry weapon, so I'm very aware of heavy DA trigger pull on the first pull.

Also, I've heard of people resting their thumb carefully on the hammer when re-holstering, and look at the hammer. If it moves when you re-holster, something is manipulating the trigger, be it clothing, whatever, and you need to clear whatever is manipulating the trigger and do it again, safely.
 

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The only thing about Signal 69's training that I disagree with (and discussed with him in class) is the need to re-holster without looking. I don't know if it would have mattered here, but it certainly helps to have visual confirmation that the holster is clear.
 

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ChipM said:
The only thing about Signal 69's training that I disagree with (and discussed with him in class) is the need to re-holster without looking. I don't know if it would have mattered here, but it certainly helps to have visual confirmation that the holster is clear.
It depends. If I'm simply re-holstering at my home, not after shooting or a self-defense shooting, then I'll certainly watch the holster making sure its clear.

If I'm practicing shooting, like I would in a self-defense shooting, I do practice re-holstering without looking.

Either way, my thumb will rest lightly on the hammer, no matter which I am doing, and if I feel any manipulation to the trigger, I stop what I'm doing, clear the holster for re-holstering and then try it again in the same manner.

I will say I've never caught a piece of my clothing on the trigger yet. Doesn't mean it won't ever happen, though.

I think its a good skill to have and practice, but I don't think you should no look everytime. You should practice it so that you can do it, but when I'm at home, just re-holstering after cleaning or something, I do look to make sure everything is clear.
 

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While working on obtaining my basic peace officer certification, an officer with the Rome City Police came in to talk to us. This gentleman was very nice, but he was missing his right thumb(I believe he was left handed). He was missing his thumb because, according to him, he shot it off while using his non-weapon hand holding the retention flap open on his duty holster.

It is always good for people to learn how to properly holster their firearm. Most people might believe this to be a non-issue, but there are some people who do not properly holster their firearm.

I have seen officer slowly pull their firearm, then holster as fast as possible. The fact is that that is the total opposite to what they should be doing. During those times that a firearm must be drawn, then it should be drawn as fast as possible, then holster the weapon only after the aggressor(s) are neutralized, then slowly holster the firearm, while assessing and possible secondary threats, and only holster it with one hand.

At least, that is how I was trained down at GPSTC(Georgia Public Safety Training Center, aka. "GipStick) during Judgmental Pistol Shooting/Training, or Judgmental Use of Deadly Force(Ability, Opportunity, and Jeopardy!).
 
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