A Piece of History... Winchester Model 1873

Discussion in 'Firearms' started by Cagleicious, Jan 6, 2011.

  1. Cagleicious

    Cagleicious New Member

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    I just wanted to share with you guys what I have inherited.. It's been at a restorer for the past 5 months so I couldn't really do much research.

    So, turns out I have a Winchester Model 1873 in .32 WCF with a full Octagonal barrel. I would call it weathered, but is in amazing shape to have been manufactured in 1889, 99 years before I even came into existence and is now somewhere near 123 years old. All of the stamped letters are CLEARLY visible and readable. It's amazing to me a company has been around this long, much less a rifle. & it brings me chills to think about the stories this rifle has to tell, and the things it could have been a part of. The rifle still cycles and fires which again, is amazing to me.. This is truly an classic and from what I've seen a collectors item. My grandfather probably didn't know what he even had.
    If anyone enjoys researching the Serial # is 329154B

    Enough from me babbling about it, here's some old skool gun PRON..


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    The inscribing here reads "Winchester's Repeating Arms. New Hartford Conn. U.S.A.

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  2. Phil1979

    Phil1979 Member Georgia Carry

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    .32 WCF also know as .32-20. Can fire a 110gr bullet at 2100fps. A beautiful historic rifle, and not bad for a self-defense rifle either.
     

  3. EJR914

    EJR914 Cheezburger Operator

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    Gorgeous rifle! :love:
     
  4. German Longshot

    German Longshot New Member

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    This is definitely a fine piece of history you have here. Something like this isn't an everyday thing to inherit from someone. Try not to have the restorers take off too much of the original finish. The more "original" it is, the more it'll be worth in the future.
     
  5. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    You're a lucky guy. I'd much rather have a gun from 1889 that has some wear on it, showing it's been used, than one that's been a safe queen and never seen the light of day.

    Have you got some ammo on order for this thing? If the gun's in decent shape, there's no reason not to shoot it with mild factory ammo.

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  6. AtlantaJames

    AtlantaJames New Member

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    As soon as I saw this rifle I knew I had to have it, the question was could I get it for the right price.

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  7. Hunley

    Hunley Active Member

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    Who did the restoration work for you and what did they do?
     
  8. howie1932

    howie1932 New Member

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    :lol: :lol: :lol: I was thinking the same thing.

    Enquiring minds want to know, do you plan on shooting it at all?
     
  9. Cagleicious

    Cagleicious New Member

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    I got the work done by Dan (I'll be damned if i could remember his last name) He works out of Gabels Sporting Good's in Douglasville. Yes that's no where near where I live, but from recommendations on here I drop it off with him along with a Carcano..
    He basically disassembled the weapons entirely, replaced any missing parts and if something wasn't functional made it work. He also cleaned up the stocks and got SOME of the rust off the metal but pretty much left them alone aesthetically. Prices seemed very reasonable for what was done.

    Here's my problem with owning any gun.. I want to shoot it, hell or high water I wanna at least put a few rounds down the tube. I don't care if it's a 200 year old Musket, or a 1 out of 100 run collectors edition 1911..
    So YES I do want to shoot it and more than likely will. Not a lot, just wanna take it and see what it's like to shoot a rifle like this.

    Same goes with the Carcano, it's one of the originals made in 1918 and is way old but still functional and a shooter.
     
  10. Savvy Jack

    Savvy Jack Banned

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    To make a long story short......Three Words......

    BLACK POWDER ONLY!

    :crossfinger:
     
  11. Cagleicious

    Cagleicious New Member

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    BTW my dad who is not insanely computer savvy found this link on my facebook and saw this post and ACTUALLY thought it was Rick who posted that. I don't think he read it well, but when he asked me how "the guy from Pawn Stars" found it, "he must have people looking non-stop for him" he was serious as a heart attack..

    I couldn't stop laughing :rotfl:
     
  12. Cagleicious

    Cagleicious New Member

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    Umm.. huh??

    Is this a re-loader's joke?
     
  13. Savvy Jack

    Savvy Jack Banned

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    No, this rifle is pre-1900 and smokless powder of today can harm it or destroy it. There are some modern powders that replicate early smokeless such as 2400 THAT replicate close too the energy/forces of black powder. Yes, smokeless was introduced in 1894 but many firearms not designed for the smokeless loads had weaker steel (including internal parts) than todays standards and the sharp energy force of the smokeless explosion can blow up (the guts) of old weaker made steel firearms. It is fairly safe to shoot modern smokeless in post 1900 firearms because by then there was a good chance all firearms used modern steel. The Winchester 30-30 was the first smokeless cartridge and offered in the Winchester model 94'...yes...manufactured in 1894. It used 30gr of the new smokeless powder OF THAT TIME of which 30gr of almost any smokeless powder now will blow it up. It was also that year when they started makeing the stronger steel to handle the smokeless loads. But again, many firearms did not use the stronger steel until post 1900.

    No need to take on chance of blowing up a good firearm.

    Need I explain more?

    Next will be the job of cleaning black powder firearms (yes, muzzle loaders as well as firearms that use black powder in their cartridges) to keep them from rusting away in your closet....unlike smokeless powder.
     
  14. seereus

    seereus Active Member

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    No, this rifle is pre-1900 and smokless powder of today can harm it or destroy it. There are some modern powders that replicate early smokeless such as 2400 THAT replicate close too the energy/forces of black powder. Yes, smokeless was introduced in 1894 but many firearms not designed for the smokeless loads had weaker steel (including internal parts) than todays standards and the sharp energy force of the smokeless explosion can blow up (the guts) of old weaker made steel firearms. It is fairly safe to shoot modern smokeless in post 1900 firearms because by then there was a good chance all firearms used modern steel. The Winchester 30-30 was the first smokeless cartridge and offered in the Winchester model 94'...yes...manufactured in 1894. It used 30gr of the new smokeless powder OF THAT TIME of which 30gr of almost any smokeless powder now will blow it up. It was also that year when they started makeing the stronger steel to handle the smokeless loads. But again, many firearms did not use the stronger steel until post 1900.

    No need to take on chance of blowing up a good firearm.

    Need I explain more?

    Next will be the job of cleaning black powder firearms (yes, muzzle loaders as well as firearms that use black powder in their cartridges) to keep them from rusting away in your closet....unlike smokeless powder.[/quote:1bukoey9]

    So could the OP have someone load some rounds using the powder you mentioned?
     
  15. Cagleicious

    Cagleicious New Member

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    No, this rifle is pre-1900 and smokless powder of today can harm it or destroy it. There are some modern powders that replicate early smokeless such as 2400 THAT replicate close too the energy/forces of black powder. Yes, smokeless was introduced in 1894 but many firearms not designed for the smokeless loads had weaker steel (including internal parts) than todays standards and the sharp energy force of the smokeless explosion can blow up (the guts) of old weaker made steel firearms. It is fairly safe to shoot modern smokeless in post 1900 firearms because by then there was a good chance all firearms used modern steel. The Winchester 30-30 was the first smokeless cartridge and offered in the Winchester model 94'...yes...manufactured in 1894. It used 30gr of the new smokeless powder OF THAT TIME of which 30gr of almost any smokeless powder now will blow it up. It was also that year when they started makeing the stronger steel to handle the smokeless loads. But again, many firearms did not use the stronger steel until post 1900.

    No need to take on chance of blowing up a good firearm.

    Need I explain more?

    Next will be the job of cleaning black powder firearms (yes, muzzle loaders as well as firearms that use black powder in their cartridges) to keep them from rusting away in your closet....unlike smokeless powder.[/quote:3j1ekn8v]



    What if it was a lighter "load"? in the round. I have read on some antique firearm forums that you can put a much lower grain count of powder to counteract the difference in pressures etc..?
     
  16. Savvy Jack

    Savvy Jack Banned

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    1. I am awful when it come to trying to explain things in the text format...do a much better job running my mouth in person. Some guys know what they are talking about and some don't. The guy called W30WCF is the best in my opinion and in other forums uses the name W44WCF. However, Kirk beet him to the topic and explained it nicely. Also noted that 2400 is not always the best choice and can be inconsistent.

    Try this link, it should help: http://levergunscommunity.org/viewtopic ... b570197fd0


    2. Cleaning a BP firearm is simple but needs to be done every time you shoot. I have not cleaned my daughter's 357 revolvers in a few years but I clean my BP shooters every time i use them. Black Powder residue does not mix with petroleum cleaning products and makes a mess inside your firearm. I clean mine with hot (evaporates faster) water followed by Ballistol oil that mixes with water. After the water evaporates, the oil is left behind. Basically after using it for a while the firearm becomes "seasoned". The BP scum is on top of the oil and simply washes off with water. After a few patches in the barrel, its squeeky clean. Once a year I break down mine and give them a good cleaning but is not necessary. There are ten thousand cleaning methods guys use but I choose to clean mine as if I were out "on the trail" and did not have modern products to use...other than the Ballistol oil. Some folks use the dish washer but that completely strips the firearm of all water based oils and the bare metals will actually rust while on the dry cycle!
     
  17. AtlantaJames

    AtlantaJames New Member

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    That's awesome! You should tell him it is Rick and he can automatically chat with him by placing his beer in the PC's drink cup holder and hitting the any key! :lol:
     
  18. jmathis84

    jmathis84 New Member

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    I have always liked these old leverguns. I wouldnt mind finding one myself. They are fun to shoot and accurate enough to do their intented job.