A Little More Practice w/ Shield 9mm

Discussion in 'Firearm Related' started by rjinga, Feb 14, 2018 at 12:43 AM.

  1. rjinga

    rjinga Member

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    I stopped at the nearby public range again today. Except for one photo, I was shooting while standing, using a strong-hand, two-handed grip. I was also aiming with both eyes open. The target was at approximately 5 yds (15'), and I fired seven rounds at CM and then seven rounds at the head. I started with Winchester White Box and finished up with Winchester USA Forged steel-cased ammunition.

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    I was aiming and firing slowly, but still managed to pull the second shot from CM down to a crotch shot. (The smaller photo is for distance perspective.)

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    This was another round of slow-fire. The paper plates have a 7" edge-to-edge diameter, and the inner diameter is 5".

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    In this photo I raised the gun from low-ready and quickly fire a single shot. (The two shots at about 8:00 on the edge of the face plate were my first two shots at the head.)

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    This time I raised the gun from low-ready and paused before firing. I ran through the White Box after firing at the CM plate and then went with the Forged the rest of the way. (The shot at about 7:00 on the edge of the CM plate was my first shot at that plate.)

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    This was slow firing again, like in the first two photos.

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    In an attempt to figure out how much of the "low and a little left" was me, I fired these seven rounds while seated, steadying my hands on my BB sock on top of the gun rest. I also closed one eye.
     
  2. RedDawnTheMusical

    RedDawnTheMusical Well-Known Member

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    Good enough for self-defense all day, everyday. Pulling a shot down low isn't uncommon - an anticipation of the recoil/report.

    If you get a chance at a range like this, practice a self-defense shooting drill where you have your target at 15', walk up to the line, pull, and rapid fire as if you're putting down an immediate threat. You may not get pretty groupings, but it builds confidence, muscle memory, and focus for that type of situation, producing better shots. Slow fire practice is always good for working on the fundamentals, but if you carry for self-defense, you want some practice as closely resembling that as possible.
     

  3. codegeek

    codegeek codegeek reincarnate

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    I just saw this drill and thought it interesting. I need to find a public range that allows drawing from the holster and rapid fire...

     
  4. RedDawnTheMusical

    RedDawnTheMusical Well-Known Member

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    1) I prefer to fire a full pull & shoot cycle, so I'm pulling from retention, addressing the target, and firing. This may be more typical in a self-defense shooting. For me, if I'm pulling, I'm likely putting you down.
    2) I understand what he's saying in the video about the controlled rapid fire (i.e. not firing too fast), but I'm not sure that I'm 100% onboard with the reasoning being that I'm accessing the need for a follow-up shot unless that assessment is if the target is still standing or not. If I'm shooting someone, they are a serious, immediate threat to my life/safety and I'm shooting until they go down, just like law enforcement does.
     
  5. Adam5

    Adam5 Atlanta Overwatch

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    You’re a little like me. No matter how many rounds I fire, I always drop one low.
     
  6. rjinga

    rjinga Member

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    I like to practice those types of drills also. However, I can't do that at this range. "One second between rounds." And, even though it doesn't specifically say that you can't practice drawing from your holster, I'm pretty sure it would not be allowed.
     
  7. rjinga

    rjinga Member

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    For me, 90% of the time it is the second or third shot.
     
  8. DonT

    DonT Active Member

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    If you can't draw, start a drill like that from either the low ready or high compressed ready. Not as good as drawing from a holster, but you can still get a lot done with rapid fire drills.

    Take a draw and shoot class that will really put you through these drills, maybe from a guy like Lee Weems. https://firstpersonsafety.com/