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I think her explanation of the rail gun is probably one of the worst examples of Journalism I have ever seen/heard. Absolutely painful to watch.
 

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In conventional guns, a bullet loses velocity from the moment the gunpowder ignites and sends it flying. The railgun projectile instead gains speed as it travels the length of a 32-foot barrel, exiting the muzzle at 4,500 miles an hour, or more than a mile a second.
In a "conventional" gun the bullet has a velocity of zero before ignition occurs. So at ignition that bullet starts losing velocity? From zero? Negative velocity? :?
 

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moe mensale said:
In a "conventional" gun the bullet has a velocity of zero before ignition occurs. So at ignition that bullet starts losing velocity? From zero? Negative velocity? :?
Yeah, it's called recoil. That's why they have those compensator ports on the barrel shroud. It makes the bullet go to warp speed as soon as your shoulder thingie starts to go up.

[/sarcasm]

:lol:
 

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They have it right. After the acceleration caused by the ignition of the propellant, the round loses velocity as it travels down the barrel.
F = (P x A) - Friction

A = F / M

V = 1/2 A x t^2

A bullet continues accelerating until the frictional force exceeds the force caused by gas pressure. Generally, until it leaves the barrel, at which point F = 0
 

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F = (P x A) - Friction

A = F / M

V = 1/2 A x t^2

A bullet continues accelerating until the frictional force exceeds the force caused by gas pressure. Generally, until it leaves the barrel, at which point F = 0
I think the point was that with a railgun the force on the projectile is constant over the length of the barrel. With a chemical propellant it tapers off.
 

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They have it right. After the acceleration caused by the ignition of the propellant, the round loses velocity as it travels down the barrel.
No, it does NOT! It accelerates continually until it exits the barrel.
 

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That's Feinstein thinking.

No, there would be a drastic increase in ammo theft.
They would simply be expanding the product market for drug dealers.
 

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Since there is no gunpowder, what's up with the muzzle flash? Gas compression and release as it exits the barrel?
 

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Since there is no gunpowder, what's up with the muzzle flash? Gas compression and release as it exits the barrel?
Not all railguns operate purely an electromagnetic field. Some use a thin layer of conductive propellant attached to the rear of the projectile, similar to the experimental designs for a caseless cartridge.

The key difference between this type of gun and a traditional firearm is that the propellant is often made of metal. The massive power dump causes the propellant to vaporize into a gas. This is the same process used by chemical propellants, except that the propellant is inert.

The other possibility is that the amount of energy being dumped creates a cloud of ionized gases or even a plasma cloud. Either could look very similar to a fireball as they exited the barrel.
 
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