50 cal air rifle

Discussion in 'Weapons' started by rougeneck, Sep 25, 2016.

  1. gunsmoker

    gunsmoker Lawyer and Gun Activist

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    Pretty cool.
    I like how it can shoot an arrow, too.

    As for using lead pellets or bullets, I don't recall the guy announcing what velocity they will have, but I've read that other big-bore air rifles that shoot 200 grain projectiles can get 600 f.p.s. velocity. So that's in the same ballpark as a .38 special (which used to use 200 and even 220 grain bullets, back in the early 20th century).

    Now, why doesn't somebody make an air rifle like this as a PUMP action, with automatic loading and feeding of the projectiles, up to maybe 20 at a time, held in a feeding tube nestled next to the barrel and the air cylinder?
    Why single-shot, bolt-action design?
     

  2. futureusr

    futureusr A Typical Cat

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  3. rougeneck

    rougeneck Member

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    [ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rVGVLCG_TD4&feature=youtu.be[/ame]
     
  4. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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  5. EJR914

    EJR914 Cheezburger Operator

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    A suppressor even on air guns would prove to just slow the air down coming out of the barrel, the same way it does with gun powder propelled projectiles.

    Slowing down the air will lesson the sound of the air forcefully leaving the barrel.

    Muffler.

    On firearms with no moving action, as to one that puts in a new round into the chamber semi-auto, if you can reduce the the force of the air coming out of the firearm enough, you would hear no extra sound at all from that, it could be completely silent.

    Especially, if your projectile never goes super-sonic.

    The sound of a projectile whizzing by your ear will always remain, but that's not a sound one can really hear unless the projectile comes close to you.

    Its all about how slow you can get the air coming out of the barrel.

    Sure a trigger pull may make a little noise, even a hammer dropping.

    With ammo with primers, those primers may make a small noise too.

    I've personally used and heard suppressors on 9mm handguns, shooting sub-sonic ammo, that were so quiet they were literally a whisper. Right conditions as well. All you could really make out was the semi-auto action of the slide throwing in a new round.

    The light noise was a "Teh-kit" sound. That was all. You could go even quieter with an air rifle with the right suppressor, and it being single shot with no moving parts putting in a new round, and no primer being struck by a hammer.
     
  6. EJR914

    EJR914 Cheezburger Operator

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    I'm sure once someone created a 30 round magazine air rifle that had good velocity, full-auto, and it became popular, the Federal Government and the ATF would quickly come in and start regulating it.

    They could probably get it passed in a week as soon as it came to their attention.
     
  7. moe mensale

    moe mensale Well-Known Member

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    If you're answering my question, you didn't. I understand how a suppressor works. I owned 3 AWC cans.

    My question concerned how the suppressor appears to be inserted into the barrel, not screwed onto the barrel. If it's really inserted into the barrel then its restricting the barrel's bore to some degree and that, I would assume, would prevent the projectile from cleanly exiting the barrel. Maybe these air guns have looser tolerances but still, you're introducing something into the bore that's got to cause some disruption to the flight path.

    Maybe I'm just missing how the attachment actually works.
     
  8. EJR914

    EJR914 Cheezburger Operator

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    I have no idea, but if you do a search on the internet, I see people asking questions about suppressors that fit over your barrel, instead of screwing inside of the threaded end of the muzzle.