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Man of Myth and Legend
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It would be great if A large percentage of dems who with no prior experience all went to the wilds for a week or so. Demographics would soon change. Wildlife in general and buzzards would have obesity problems.
 
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Want a good laugh? Remember, details matter.

Nemo

Survive? If they can find water and stay warm, they can survive. They might lose a bunch of weight, but "survive" is a very low standard. I think the majority of Americans probably could "survive," even without skill sets.

Since when is starting a fire with "flint" the test of surviving? Anybody know where to find flint in "the wilderness?" 🤣
 

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Anybody know where to find flint in "the wilderness?" 🤣
Yes if it's there to begin with.
Flint can be found in the wild spaces of Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming. The deposits are concentrated in the areas covered by these states, making them great places to start your search. Flint is not found naturally in the western, southwestern or mid-southern regions of the United States.
Take the creek I live on. It has many flint deposits as do most all creeks and rivers in this part of the world. Remember a great inland sea covered most of the southeastern United States millions of years ago. Inland sea equals flint here and many other places. The flint deposits are not deep and usually crop out in many places especially in creek beds and along river banks where it has been exposed. In many places it's laying everywhere Like Brier Creek and Beaver Dam Creek in Southeast Georgia. The lower Chattahoochee River is full of it.
So yes people can find flint where it is which is a bunch of places.
As a side note where I live is smack dab on top of a Native American site that goes back to the Mid- Archaic up to the Woodland period. That around 8000 years of occupation. The Quote experts from area Colleges and Universities have been after me for years to dig in it,but it's fine where it is. I find stuff all the time when planting new trees or moving dirt in general. I'm attaching some pictures of a sample of what has turned up on my place over the years. The pottery shards represent all types from the first made right up until Invasion of the European hordes. Also in the basket you'll see a broken item that is rarely found. See if you can find it if you know what it is.
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I remember going to a flea market somewhere on 41 hwy up near Lake Allatoona. I was a kid, and my parents would round all us kids up and we would spend a Saturday there. They sold hot boiled peanuts and all other sorts of stuff. There was one place that even sold ninja stuff. Nunchucks, throwing stars, a little knife called "The Riverboat Tickler", ninja suits, those little claws used to climb trees, etc.and I had decided, at the age of 7 or 8, that I was going to be the world's next "Bruce Lee". So, I would save my allowance and would purchase that stuff. I had to practice my ninja skills (I actually did get pretty good with the nunchucks).

Anyways ...there was a "Rambo" type knife they sold too. It had a "survival" kit inside of the knife handle. On the bottom of the handle, there was a compass. You unscrewed the compass, and inside the hollowed out handle was a survival kit. It had smelling salts, needles and thread to sew stitches, a magnifying glass (to start fires), a wire you attached sticks to each end to be used as a saw, a few fishing hooks and fishing string, etc.

Anyone else remember those?
 

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I remember going to a flea market somewhere on 41 hwy up near Lake Allatoona. I was a kid, and my parents would round all us kids up and we would spend a Saturday there. They sold hot boiled peanuts and all other sorts of stuff. There was one place that even sold ninja stuff. Nunchucks, throwing stars, a little knife called "The Riverboat Tickler", ninja suits, those little claws used to climb trees, etc.and I had decided, at the age of 7 or 8, that I was going to be the world's next "Bruce Lee". So, I would save my allowance and would purchase that stuff. I had to practice my ninja skills (I actually did get pretty good with the nunchucks).

Anyways ...there was a "Rambo" type knife they sold too. It had a "survival" kit inside of the knife handle. On the bottom of the handle, there was a compass. You unscrewed the compass, and inside the hollowed out handle was a survival kit. It had smelling salts, needles and thread to sew stitches, a magnifying glass (to start fires), a wire you attached sticks to each end to be used as a saw, a few fishing hooks and fishing string, etc.

Anyone else remember those?
Harbor Freight sells those survival knives now for somewhere around 10bucks. Surprisingly sharp - I’ve put on in all my cars, along with a small multi tool and such.
Jonathan
 

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Man of Myth and Legend
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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Try to pry something with one of those. There is minimal tang on the blade and near any prying with it will cause it to break right where the handle meets the grip. Batoning it to try to split up a piece of wood will likely cause breakage also. Do not trust it without trying it first.

If you want something similar try the Schrade. Its made of one piece of steel. Get one, remove the bit of a tool kit included and add appropriate things. Note the sheath and pouch attached. Thats worthwhile also.

I sewed on another blade sheath with a blade better suited for shaft attachment and as always 2 is 1, 1 is none. The smaller one also comes with a spark stick.

Add a water filter straw and you should be good for 3-5 days if you have more than half a lick of sense. Seems most around here do.

If you want to easily make a fire with the spark stick, fix up some Vaseline straws to go with it. A couple inside the knife handle is a real good idea. A good spark stick makes the match and strike paper (although strike anywhere ones are better) unnecessary in the straw.
See links below.

Nemo







 

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I remember going to a flea market somewhere on 41 hwy up near Lake Allatoona. I was a kid, and my parents would round all us kids up and we would spend a Saturday there. They sold hot boiled peanuts and all other sorts of stuff. There was one place that even sold ninja stuff. Nunchucks, throwing stars, a little knife called "The Riverboat Tickler", ninja suits, those little claws used to climb trees, etc.and I had decided, at the age of 7 or 8, that I was going to be the world's next "Bruce Lee". So, I would save my allowance and would purchase that stuff. I had to practice my ninja skills (I actually did get pretty good with the nunchucks).

Anyways ...there was a "Rambo" type knife they sold too. It had a "survival" kit inside of the knife handle. On the bottom of the handle, there was a compass. You unscrewed the compass, and inside the hollowed out handle was a survival kit. It had smelling salts, needles and thread to sew stitches, a magnifying glass (to start fires), a wire you attached sticks to each end to be used as a saw, a few fishing hooks and fishing string, etc.

Anyone else remember those?
I seem to remember them as cheap and easily breakable.
 

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Survive? If they can find water and stay warm, they can survive. They might lose a bunch of weight, but "survive" is a very low standard. I think the majority of Americans probably could "survive," even without skill sets.
I'm encouraged by your confidence in the majority of folks being able to survive for 16 days in the wilderness but I'm just as confident that they would mostly find a way to kill themselves by doing something stupid.
 
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The original Marine Corps K-Bar is one that's nice to have out in the boonies. The damn things are tough.
 

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Remember the survival rule of fours: You can survive four minutes without air, four hours without shelter, four days without water, four weeks without food. Won't be pleasant, but meet these basic needs within the allotted time and you will survive. Humans are tool users. Without tools we are remarkably helpless, with tools we have conquered the world. Pick tools that get you the resources to survive in time or can help you make such tools in the allotted time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·

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My boot knife hit the back of my hand today
It's split open and bleeding all over the place
My numbchucks hit the back of my skull today
I fell asleep now I can't really see very straight

I might need help but I aint got nothin to say
I hope my Gramma don't take my weapons away
2x

Riverboat Tickler cut my hand today
I hope my Gramma don't take my knives away

My numbchucks were flying all over the place
I took a nap I think my gramma took my numbchucks away
My Gramma said boy I don't like the way you play
I said Gramma I'm a ninja this is how I train.
 

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Survive? If they can find water and stay warm, they can survive. They might lose a bunch of weight, but "survive" is a very low standard. I think the majority of Americans probably could "survive," even without skill sets.
OK in fairness I'm going to give you a point or two for that post.😁

 

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For a couple of years I've been using Scandanavian knives, mostly the Helle Eggen (out of Norway). It's a great bushcraft knife. Helle uses a triple-laminated blade, with a core of high-carbon steel (~58-59 HRC) sandwiched between two sheets of 18/8 stainless, so it maintains a razor edge while at the same time being flexible/strong enough for batoning and general camp use. I guess I've used it for about 50 days of camping since I got it, and while the finish is pretty beat up, it has proven its durability.

Pretty, too.

DH
 

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Try to pry something with one of those. There is minimal tang on the blade and near any prying with it will cause it to break right where the handle meets the grip. Batoning it to try to split up a piece of wood will likely cause breakage also. Do not trust it without trying it first.

If you want something similar try the Schrade. Its made of one piece of steel. Get one, remove the bit of a tool kit included and add appropriate things. Note the sheath and pouch attached. Thats worthwhile also.

I sewed on another blade sheath with a blade better suited for shaft attachment and as always 2 is 1, 1 is none. The smaller one also comes with a spark stick.

Add a water filter straw and you should be good for 3-5 days if you have more than half a lick of sense. Seems most around here do.

If you want to easily make a fire with the spark stick, fix up some Vaseline straws to go with it. A couple inside the knife handle is a real good idea. A good spark stick makes the match and strike paper (although strike anywhere ones are better) unnecessary in the straw.
See links below.

Nemo







Great!!
very sharp o_O
 

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OK in fairness I'm going to give you a point or two for that post.😁

Having grown up there, I am always surprised by folks not realizing how much wilderness still exists in Oregon. If your legs work, it is very easy to get away from civilization.
 

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If your legs work, it is very easy to get away from civilization.
There in lies the problem. A 24 year old brain with near 80 year old legs.
You young gents need to be in woods whenever you can.
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