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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just recently acquired a brand new Glock 20 and it is my first 10mm. Just have a few question maybe you 10mm pro's out there can answer. I will not be using it for carry at all rather it will be my woods sidearm when camping and hunting in and around Ellijay. I am looking for both range ammo that feeds well through the Glock as well as a heavy load to carry when I go in the woods. I know that buffalo bore makes a "heavy 10mm" round and was curious if anyone has tried those and what the results were? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Mike
 

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Handload.
 

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Handload them, and make them as powerful as you can. :D

(Without blowing up your firearm)
 

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EJR914 said:
Handload them, and make them as powerful as you can. :D

(Without blowing up your firearm)
+1,

You can get magnum velocities outta that 10mm with some lovin (or so I have been told).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the help however I do not have the space or resources to get all of the equipment needed to reload myself nor do I have the slightest clue how do it correctly. Maybe one day I can start saving alot of money on ammo but that's not in the near future. Is there a next best alternative?

Mike
 

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The 155 grain Gold Dot seems to be a toasty round at 1,400+ fps at the muzzle and 750+ ft lbs of energy.

I'm not sure what you'd run in to this region of the country that can "absorb" more than a few of those.

But as everyone has said, loading your own is the way to go if you ever get the chance. You can bury the ballistics you'll get from any mfg.
 

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You can get a single stage press setup for 10mm pretty cheaply and you would only need a small bench to set it up. With the cost of 10mm factory ammo you would make your money back in no time, even with the slowness of a single stage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ok... You have peaked my interest for sure but I still have no idea how to reload correctly. With a single stage press does that mean one bullet at a time? and what else would I need to get started? I understand brass, bullets, powder, primers, etc. I mean just as far as equipment what else would I need? Thank for any help.

Mike
 

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Start with this book, just over $30.

Then start looking at presses. A single stage means you can do one thing with the press at a time (seat bullet, size brass, add primer etc...), having to stop after each step and change hardware.

Most go with a 3 stage as the minimum.

Just like home brewing beer, the first place to start is a good instructional book, read it and re-read it, then you should have the essentials to get your hands dirty.
 

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I to own the G20 and carry it from time to time. While carrying, I have mine loaded with the 175gr Silvertips from Winchester. I have also fed it the 180gr JHP from Buffalo Bore (it is advertised at 1350fps with 728 ft. lbs.) with no problems. Most of these posts seem to lean toward loading your own ammo, but if you are wanting a "hot" load available from a manufacturer, Buffalo Bore and Double Tap are good ones to try. As for range use, the "canned heat" from Georgia Arms has worked fine for me. It is 500 rounds of 180 gr FMJ (I think they advertise it at 1150 or 1200 fps, cant remember) in an ammo can for $200. It is new, not reloaded ammo and it is the cheapest I have found.
 

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I believe the 155 grain 10mm bullets are not stabilized as well as a bullet of higher weight and a longer shank, with the ogive being the same. That's my experience, and I'd not ever shoot 155s again in 10 mm.
 

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I also avoid plated bullets in the Glock barrel, as they keyhole.
 

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Bullets like Berry have a plating on them instead of a jacket. It is cheaper, but the bullet coating is softer. The Glock barrel has no rifling. At low velocity, like in the .40 180 grain, this seems to work ok. At higher velocity, say the exact same .40 180 grain bullet shoved into a 10mm case, the softer coating permits the bullet to go down the barrel without twisting as fast as the octaganal shape inside the barrel is intended to spin the bullet. It "slips." As a result, the bullet is unstable when it leaves the barrel, like shooting a musket ball.

Jacketed bullets are more expensive and harder and the octagonal "rifling" seems to grab jacketed bullets just fine, even at 10mm velocities, twisting them as designed.

Unfortunately, some manufacturers advertise plated bullets as FMJ, so it is hard to tell without asking directly.
 
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